Upcoming Events

 

 

For further information see below and/or email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

 

 


WMN Feminist Bookclub

When: Thursday October 5, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday August 3rd 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Mary Shelley's Frankenstein. Interested? Click here for more details.


 Nadine Williams - Farewell My French Love

When: Thursday 12th October 6.30pm


Where: Carlton Library

 

 

 

Farewell My French Love is a bitter/sweet memoir of how Adelaide author and former journalist, Nadine Williams coped with the death of her French-born husband Olivier.

A Sydney-based woman friend suggested a trip to France to recover, which was both exhilarating and harrowing as these intrepid women, travelling independently from Barcelona to Paris, clashed over different food attitudes, fashion, politics and French culture. However, their friendship survived as they shared the travel experience in the Loire Valley and enjoyed the company of French women. Once more alone in Paris, magical things happened as Nadine tries to regain a new identity as a widow.

Bookings essential. You do not need to bring a ticket with you to this event.

Register here
 

 


 

Book Launch: Refiguring Techniques

When: Tuesday 17 October 6-8pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The RMIT School of Media and Communications and the Digital Ethnography Research Centre is pleased to present the launch for Refiguring Techniques in Digital Visual Research at The Brunswick Street Bookstore on Tuesday the 17th October.

This book interrogates how new digital-visual techniques and technologies are being used in emergent configurations of research and intervention. It discusses technological change and technological possibility; theoretical shifts toward processual paradigms; and a respectful ethics of responsibility. The contributors explore how new and evolving digital-visual technologies and techniques have been utilized in the development of research, and reflect on how such theory and practice might advance what is “knowable” in a world of smartphones, drones, and 360-degree cameras.

Drinks and snacks provided, all welcome to attend.

 


 

Book Launch: Bonny Cassidy

When: Thursday 19 October 6pm for 6.30 start


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The Brunswick Street Bookstore is pleased to present the launch for Bonny Cassidy's third collection of poetry Chatelaine in store on Tuesday the 17th October.

Chatelaine is a collection of poems peopled by characters who, like a family portrait, resemble one another in foxed, latent ways. Their voices stalk outside of time and place, inhabiting the genres of riddle, fragment, confession, lyric and ekphrasis, and returning to images of metamorphosis and occupation. The poems present a mossy, alien cosmology where aeroplanes are forest-like and ‘signifiers turn to pulp outside the window’. They also express a language and mood inherited through genealogy, an ethics of kin. With influences from Kabir to New Wave Australian cinema, Lucie Brock-Broido to Oceanic sculpture, they ask: who does the poem belong to? Who lives there and who comes to visit?

Bonny Cassidy is the author of Certain Fathoms and Final Theory, and co-editor of Contemporary Australian Feminist Poetry. Cassidy is the feature reviews editor for Cordite Poetry Review and manages the bachelor of creative writing program at RMIT.

Drinks and snacks provided, all welcome to attend.

 


 

Book Launch: Titus O'Reilly

When: Wednesday 1 November 7pm


Where: Reading Room at the Fitzroy Library

 



 
The Brunswick Street Bookstore is pleased to present the launch for Titus O'Reilly's A Thoroughly Unhelpful History of Australian Sport at the Fitzroy Library store on Wednesday November 1st

Titus O’Reily, Australia’s least insightful sports writer, takes you through the history of Australian sport and the people who made it. In his inimitable comic style, he explains how sport has shaped this wide brown country into the greatest nation to ever stride the sporting globe.

Covering League, Aussie Rules, Tennis, Cricket, Football, Swimming, Netball, Union, Quidditch and many more, Titus looks at how sport has united Australians and given them something to do in their spare time. Part history, part social commentary and part the ravings of a madman, Titus examines:

· League vs Union, what it says about you as a person
· Why it’s the AFL’s fault that Victorians are so awful
· How soccer is the biggest threat to Australia since Communism
· Can you not like sport and be an Australian?
· The etiquette of watching sport
· Cricket, is not boring, OK Sharon?
· Horse racing, not just about betting but mostly about betting
· The Olympics or why Australia is only important every four years

Bookings forthcoming.

 


 


The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Every second Wednesday


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin,
Ian Laking and Luke Manly. They are up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

http://themorningbell.com.au

 



 
 PAST EVENTS

 

 


WMN Feminist Bookclub

When: Thursday July 6, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday August 3rd 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Rupi Kaur's Milk and Honey. Interested? Click here for more details.

 


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 2 August, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

 

 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 2 August is Neil Rennison.

Neil Rennison is the original founder of Tin Man Games and has worked in the games industry for over 15 years, being involved in over 50 published games. Coming from a background in Product Design, Neil first started out as a 3D modeller and got his first games industry break working with Razorworks in the UK on a series of racing games. After working as a freelancer, Neil then started Fraction Studios, a game art outsourcing and contracting company who specialised in designing robust art pipelines for handheld and low-end console game developers. Neil has worked on numerous high profile titles including the Need For Speed series, Nascar series, Sims series and the Tiger Woods Golf series for a variety of platforms including iPhone, DS, PSP, and Wii. Fraction closed its doors in 2011 so that Neil could concentrate fully on Tin Man Games. Neil  has had a number of articles published in 3D World magazine & PC Format, has dabbled in university lecturing, is an adjudicator for government funding in games, and has given talks at various gaming conventions and IGDA gatherings. Fun Fact: In the mid 80s Neil became Elite status on his ZX Spectrum 48k version of Elite!

 


 

 Antarctica and the Climate - with Chris Turney

When: Wednesday 2nd August, 6:15 - 7:15pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre

 

Antarctica holds valuable clues to understanding the future of our planet – especially regarding the implications of climate change. It is also a continent unwilling to give up those secrets readily.

 

 

 

There are few as cognisant of both truths as earth scientist Chris Turney. In 2013, a century after Douglas Mawson’s pioneering scientific expedition across the continent, Turney led a follow-up journey, with a view to recording how Antarctica’s climate had changed over the intervening years. Less than a month after setting sail, the boat was trapped in ice, along with its crew and 52 passengers – including Turney and his immediate family. The costly rescue mission garnered international headlines, and ignited a debate about what constitutes acceptable risk in the pursuit of scientific knowledge.

 

 

 

Join Professor Turney as he explores the past, present and future of Antarctica – a continent that acutely bears the impacts of our changing climate – and relives the expedition that inadvertently sent him following the fateful path of Ernest Shackleton, one of Antarctica’s unluckiest adventurers.

 

SOLD OUT

 


 Dennis Glover - The Last Man in Europe

When: Thursday 27th July 6:30 - 7:30pm


Where: Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room

 



 

April, 1947. In a run-down farmhouse on a remote Scottish island, George Orwell begins his last and greatest work: Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Forty-three years old and suffering from the tuberculosis that within three winters will take his life, Orwell comes to see the book as his legacy – the culmination of a career spent fighting to preserve the freedoms which the wars and upheavals of the twentieth century have threatened. Completing the book is an urgent challenge, a race against death.

Join us for an evening with Dennis Glover as he discusses his new book, The Last Man in Europe, an illuminating novel that masterfully explores the creation of Orwell’s classic work, which for millions of readers worldwide defined the twentieth century. Simultaneously a captivating drama, a unique literary excavation and an unflinching portrait of a beloved British writer, The Last Man in Europe will change the way you understand Nineteen Eighty-Four.

Dennis Glover grew up in Doveton before studying at Monash University and King’s College, Cambridge, where he was awarded a PhD in history. He has worked for two decades as an academic, newspaper columnist, political adviser and speechwriter to Labor leaders and senior ministers.

This event is sponsored by the Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.

Please register here

 

 


 

Book Launch: Brigid Delaney

When: Wednesday 19 July, 6:30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 

Join Brigid Delaney for the launch of Wellmania: Extreme Misadventures in the Search of Wellness.

Wellmania is an in-depth, entertaining, laugh-out-loud-funny exploration of one of the most fascinating trends in our culture. Her columns on the wellness industry for the Guardian have gone viral, with more than 100,000 page views in the UK, Australia and the US.

Cold-press juices, hot yoga, quitting sugar, Paleo, mindfulness... if you embrace these things you will be happy, you will be well – just ask Instagram. From celebrity vegan chefs to sleep gurus, there is no shortage of people trying to sell us the wellness dream. Wellness has become a billion-dollar industry. But what does wellness even mean? Does any of this stuff actually work? Is there any science behind it?

Feeling exhausted and a bit stressed and flabby, journalist Brigid Delaney decides to find out – using herself as the guinea pig. Starting with a brutal 101-day fast, Brigid tests the things that are meant to make us well – yoga classes, colonics, mediation, CBT, Balinese healing, silent retreats and group psychotherapy, and sorts through what works and what is just expensive hype. She asks: what does this obsession say about us? Is total wellness possible, or even desirable? Where’s the fun in it all? And why do you smell so bad when you haven’t eaten in seven days?

Brigid Delaney is a senior writer for The Guardian Australia. She has previously worked as a lawyer and journalist at The Sydney Morning Herald, the Telegraph (London), ninemsn and CNN. She is the author of two books: This Restless Life and Wild Things.

Kindly RSVP for this event at events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

 


 

 The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 12 July, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

 

 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 12 July is Danielle Binks.

Danielle Binks is an editor, book blogger, literary agent, and youth literature advocate. The short story in a #LoveOzYA anthology is her first book publication, and marks her as an emerging voice in the Australian YA landscape. Visit daniellebinks.com to find out more.

http://daniellebinks.com/

 


 

WMN Feminist Bookclub

When: Thursday July 6, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday July 6 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Chimamanda Ngozi Adichi's Americanah. Interested? Click here for more details.


 

The Big Dry : Alcohol and Us

When: Tuesday 27 June, 6:15 - 7:15pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre

In our backyards, balconies and beer gardens – Australians get along famously with booze. Drinking is an entrenched part of our national identity: it’s a recurrent theme in our pop culture, a scene-setter for friendship, a supposedly inherent part of work and play.

Lately, though, as the personal, social and public health costs of drinking become clear, many Australians are reconsidering our indulgent traditions. Some have even suggested that alcohol will go the way of the cigarette once its connection to chronic or life-threatening illnesses is fully acknowledged.

Jill Stark is the author of High Sobriety: My Year Without Booze. As an Age reporter, she’s written extensively about the escalating toll of alcohol abuse in Australia. Writer Jenny Valentish’s book, Woman of Substances, tells her own story (as well as those found in rehab facilities, halfway houses and AA groups), as she explored the paths people take into and out of addiction. In the process, she’s discovered that women’s experiences of substance abuse and treatment differ greatly from those of men.

Along with Chris Raine – founder of Hello Sunday Morning, an online initiative aiming to refocus drinking behaviour on individual choice, rather than cultural expectation – and host Jacinta Parsons, we’ll open a fresh discussion about Australia’s changing relationship with alcohol, and how we can anticipate and deal with the side effects.

SOLD OUT

 


The Morning Bell - Live Podcast

When: Wednesday 21 June, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 21 June is Kim Kane

 

KIM KANE was born in London in a bed bequeathed by Wordsworth for '...a writer, a dancer or a poet'. Despite this auspicious beginning, she went on to practise law. Kim's picture book Family Forest was shortlisted for the 2011 Children's Book Council of Australia (CBCA) Awards. The Vegetable Ark was a 2011 CBCA Notable Book in two categories. Kim's first novel, Pip: the story of Olive, won the 2008 Barbara Ramsden Award and was shortlisted for the 2009 Australian Book Industry Awards and the Speech Pathology Australian awards. Kim lives with her family in Melbourne. She writes whenever and wherever she can.

https://www.allenandunwin.com/authors/k/kim-kane

 


 

 The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 7 June, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

 

 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 7 June is Jay Kristoff

Jay Kristoff is a New York Times and international bestselling author of science fiction and fantasy. He grew up in the second most isolated capital city on earth and fled at his earliest convenience, although he’s been known to trek back for weddings of the particularly nice and funerals of the particularly wealthy. He spent most of his formative years locked in his bedroom with piles of books, or gathered around dimly-lit tables rolling polyhedral dice. Being the holder of an Arts degree, he has no education to speak of.

His Lotus War trilogy was critically acclaimed in Kirkus and Publishers Weekly, nominated for the David Gemmell Morningstar and Legend awards and won the 2014 Aurealis Award. Jay’s new series, the SciFi thriller The Illuminae Files, was co-authored with Amie Kaufman. Book 1, Illuminae, became a New York Times and international bestseller, was named among the Kirkus, Amazon and YALSA Best Books of 2015, became a finalist for the Prime Minister’s Literary Award and won the 2016 Aurealis Award and an ABIA Book of the Year award. .

Jay’s new fantasy series, The Nevernight Chronicle, commenced with book 1, Nevernight from St Martins Press/Thomas Dunne Books and Harper Voyager in 2016. The novel was an international bestseller, won the Aurealis award and earned Kristoff his second Gemmell nomination. Part 2, Godsgrave arrives in Septmber, 2017.

https://jaykristoff.com/

 


 

WMN Feminist Bookclub

When: Thursday June 1, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday June 1 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Susan Carland's Fighting Hislam. Interested? Click here for more details.

 

 


 Book Launch: Dr Catherine Gomes

When: Wednesday 31 May, 6-8pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 

The RMIT School of Media and Communications and the Digital Ethnography Research Centre is pleased to announce that Dr Catherine Gomes will launch four new books on Wednesday 31 May at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Professor Fazal Rizvi, Professor of Global Studies at the University of Melbourne will open the event.

Transient Mobility and Middle Class Identity: Media and Migration in Australia and Singapore offers an understanding of the transient migration experience in the Asia-Pacific through the lens of communication and entertainment media.  specifically looks at the upwardly mobile middle class transient migrants studying and working in two of the Asia-Pacific’s most desirable transient migration destinations – Australia and Singapore – providing a cutting edge study of the identities transient migrants create and maintain while overseas and the strategies they use to cope with life in transience.

International Student Connectedness and Identity: Transnational Perspectives  focuses on the interrelationship between international student connectedness and identity from transnational and transdisciplinary perspectives. It addresses the core issues surrounding international students’ physical and virtual connectedness to people, places and communities as well as the conditions that shape their transnational connectedness and identity formation. Further, it analyses the nature, diversity and complexity of international student connectedness and identity development across different national, social and cultural boundaries.

Quality Assurance in Asia-Pacific Universities: Implementing Massification in Higher Education offers extended discussion and discourse on quality issues at the university level in modern higher education systems.  It examines how university quality is being manifested, analyzed, and measured within a range of specific institutions and historical contexts and explores the new development of self-accreditation in Asian nations aimed at enhancing institutional autonomy as well as promoting an institution’s internal quality mechanism

The Asia-Pacific in the Age of Transnational Mobility: The Search for Community and Identity on and through Social Media presents a study of the challenges of community and identity in the evolving transnational migrant and ethnographic landscapes of the Asia Pacific in the era of social media.  Recognising these layered and intertwined complexities governing societal and cultural cohesion, this collection discusses the innate challenges of the social media era on culture, identity and social interaction. This original empirical work documents social media as a user platform for the expression of individual and collective identities.

Catherine Gomes is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Media and Communication where she teaches Asian Studies.  She is leader of the Migration and Digital Media Research Lab.  Catherine was also also an Australian Research Council DECRA Fellow (2013-2016) working on a project about the social and cultural spaces occupied by transient migrants (international students and workers).   Catherine has worked extensively on the themes of of identity, migration, ethnicity, memory, multiculturalism and transnationalism in Australia and Singapore as well as on the information-seeking behaviour of international students in Australia.

 


 

Brit Bennett

When: Thursday May 25 7:30pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre

 

                         


Debut novels announcing the arrival of fresh, young talents are often praised for their capacity to dazzle. Freshly anointed literary darlings are ‘brilliant’,  ‘precocious’ and ‘virtuosic’.

But such descriptions don’t exactly fit with 26-year-old Californian author Brit Bennett, whose stirring first novel, The Mothers, is remarkable not for its flashy prose or clever metanarrative manoeuvres but for its restrained eloquence.

Bennett’s protagonist, 17-year-old Nadia, lives in a conservative black Christian community in Southern California. The Mothers is a story that navigates both familiar coming-of-age fare (stifling small-town life, evolving friendships, vocation) and complex moral terrain (abortion, suicide, religion) with subtlety, intelligence and wry humour.

Bennett’s talents have seen her rise in demand as an essayist, too. Her non-fiction work, much of which has centred on American racial politics and identity, has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times and the Paris Review.

In conversation with Emily Sexton, Bennett will discuss writing, American identities and the mother of 2016 debuts.

Free event, bookings essential. Book here.

 


 

 The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 10 May, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 10 May is Emilie Zoey Baker


Emilie Zoey Baker is an award-winning Australian poet, educator, slam nerd and spoken-word performer who has toured North America, Europe and Asia. She was also the winner of the 2010 Berlin International Literature Festival’s poetry slam Slam!Review in which she competed as the first-ever Australian entrant among contestants from ten countries. At home, she performs regularly at arts and literature festivals, and has appeared at the Sydney Opera House and TEDx Melbourne. She has had visits in schools and universities all over the world and in 2014 she was the first ever Australian poet to be core Faculty at Canada’s Banff centre for the annual spoken word program.

Her poetry has been published widely in Australia and internationally. Her Chapbook She Wore the Sky On Her Shoulders published by Hit&Miss as well as Bombora and Pixellations. She's also the author of 14 children's books published by Book Group Australia.

http://www.emiliezoeybaker.com/


 

WMN Feminist Book Club

When: Thursday May 4, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday May 4, 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Margaret Atwoods The Handmaid's Tale. Interested? Click here for more details.


 The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 12 April, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 12 April is C.S. Pacat.

C.S. Pacat is the author of the best-selling Captive Prince trilogy. Born in Australia and educated at the University of Melbourne, she has since lived in a number of cities, including Tokyo and Perugia. She currently resides and writes in Melbourne.

Her first series began its life as an original-fiction web serial, which attracted viral attention before being acquired by Penguin USA. The Captive Prince trilogy went on to become a USA Today bestseller after being published to commercial success and critical acclaim.

http://cspacat.com/


Don and Patricia Edgar: Reinventing Middle Age

When: Wednesday 12 April 6:30pm


Where: at Fitzroy Library. Bookings Essential : Book online or call 1300 695 427

 



 
Society is changing faster than policies and attitudes are keeping up with. People are living longer, retiring from work later, and remaining active and valuable contributors to the community. Peak: Reinventing Middle Age is the latest book by sociologists, Patricia and Don Edgar. Join us for an optimistic and energetic discussion with the authors, challenging readers, governments and the broader community to recognise and embrace the changes brought about by increased longevity

This event is sponsored by the Thomas, Samuel and George Ewing Trust.

Books on sale from the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 


 

 

 WMN Feminist Book Club

When: April 6, 6:30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Next book club is Thursday April 6, 6:30pm and the group will be discussing Roxanne Gay's Difficult Women. Interested? Click here for more details.


 

Kate Grenville : The Smell Test

When: Monday March 20 7:30pm


Where: at The Northcote Town Hall



Many grand pronouncements have been made about the power of perfume – most of them by glamorous people who sell perfume. (‘A woman who doesn’t wear perfume has no future,’ said Coco Chanel. ‘A woman’s perfume tells more about her than her handwriting,’ said Christian Dior.) But what do we know about the harmful effects of fragrances; the power of perfume to make us sick?

Fragrance is the surprising subject of the latest book from celebrated Australian author Kate Grenville. After a period of ill health brought on by exposure to perfumes, Grenville started looking into the science of scents and the influence of the fragrance industry.

The Case Against Fragrance is a result of her investigation – a work of non-fiction combining memoir with rigorous research. Grenville discovered that synthetic fragrances – found not just in stylish little bottles on top of dressing tables, but also inside household items like shampoos and bin-liners – can be linked to asthma, hormone disruption and even cancer.

Join this masterful writer and storyteller for a startling take on the links between scent, myth and memory … and for some insights into why the fragrance industry might not pass the smell test. Hosted by Sally Warhaft.

Tickets: $25 and $15 concession, plus 30c booking fee. Book here

Kate has requested that the audience refrain from wearing perfume at this event.

 


 

 WMN Feminist Book Club

When: every first Thursday of the month at 6.30pm, starting Thursday 2 March


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Women’s Melbourne Network, your local grassroots group for all things feminist in Melbourne, is bringing their monthly Feminist Book Club to the Brunswick Bookstore. Join WMN on the first Thursday of every month for wine, food and feminist discussion. Starting on 2 March at 6:30, WMN will be kicking off the year with Clementine Ford’s debut book Fight Like a Girl. Interested? Click here for details. 


 

 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 1 March, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 15 February is acclaimed fantasy author Michael Pryor.

www.michaelpryor.com.au

 

 


 

 Madeleine Thien: Displacement and Defiance

When: Thursday 2 March, 6.15pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre. SOLD OUT sorry



‘I like to think of home as a verb, something we keep re-creating,’ Madeleine Thien has said.

It’s an exhilarating idea from a Man Booker-shortlisted author who is continually drawn to themes of displacement, individual expression and revolution. Thien is Canadian and of Chinese-Malaysian descent and she’s dramatised the traumatic upheavals of 20th-century Asian history in some extraordinary works of fiction.

Her 2011 book, Dogs at the Perimeter, was set in Pol Pot’s Cambodia, while her most recent work, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, explores the profound, abiding impact of the Cultural Revolution in China. The latter novel, shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker prize, tells the story of two musical families in China, from the 1940s through the Tiananmen Square protests to the present day. The work draws in surprising, exquisite ways on Western classical music and turns on themes of artistic and individual defiance and frailty in Mao’s China.

Appearing in conversation with author (and Chinese history buff) Toni Jordan, Thien will discuss political upheaval and the artistic imagination.

 


 

Still Lucky: Rebecca Huntley in Conversation

When: Wednesday 15 February, 7pm


Where: at Fitzroy Library. Bookings Essential : Book online or call 1300 695 427

 



 
At a time when politics seems increasingly negative and our society increasingly divided, Still Lucky shows that we are more fortunate than we think, and have more in common than we know.

Join us as for an evening with one of Australia’s most experienced and knowledgeable social researchers, Rebecca Huntley.

This event is sponsored by the Thomas, Samuel and George Ewing Trust.

Books on sale from the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 15 February, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.


The next guest on Wednesday 15 February is Elizabeth Flux. Liz is a freelance writer and editor who has been published in Junkee, Kill Your Darlings, The Lifted Brow, Film Ink, Metro, Lip Magazine, Spook, and by herself on the blog she’s been writing from the age of fifteen. She previously edited On Dit, co-coordinated Buzzcuts in 2012, and coordinated Signal Express for The Emerging Writers’ Festival in 2013. In 2016 she attended the Hong Kong International Festival funded by the UNESCO City of Literature Travel Fund. Between all this she drinks vast amounts of tea and tweets terrible puns @ElizabethFlux


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast with Greg Pyers

When: Wednesday 1 February, 7pm

 
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a literary podcast dedicated to exploring all forms of the writing industry. Every second Wednesday a guest joins host Joel Martin and co-hosts Luke Manly and Ian Laking at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

The next guest on Wednesday 1 February is Greg Pyers. Greg grew up in the small Victorian town of Daylesford. As a boy, he read the books of Gerald Durrell, and many years later, worked at Durrell’s famous Jersey Zoo. Greg became a full-time writer in 1998, following eight years as an educator in zoos, and several years as a post-primary schoolteacher. He went on to write 160 natural history books and three novels for children. Greg Pyers was short listed in the 2005 Children’s Book Council Awards in the non-fiction category. He won a 2004 Whitley Award from the Royal Zoological Society of NSW for Life in a Rock Pool, Gum Tree, Creek, and Desert Dune. In The Wilderness Society’s 2002 Environment Award For Children’s Literature, he won a Lifetime Achievement Award for his outstanding contribution to children’s environmental literature. In 2005, Greg won another Wilderness Society Award, this time for non-fiction. The Unfortunate Victim is Greg’s first work of adult fiction.

 

 


 

Meet Portuguese Artists Nic and Ines

When: Saturday 7 January, 5pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The creative couple Nic and Inês have travelled around the world for 100 days, in search of inspiration for their artwork, books, illustration, and art teaching. Australia is the last country on their journey so they will present and exhibit their findings, drawings and objects that have been gathered in 3 continents, 10 states, 18 flights, too many kilometres to remember in tuk-tuks and taxis. Come join them and ask any question you wish!


 

 

 Double Book Launch: Stuart Cooke's Opera and Berndt Sellheim's Awake at the Wheel

When: Tuesday 6 December, 6.30pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
Paul Carter will launch two dynamic and original poetry collections in Melbourne this December: Opera by Stuart Cooke and Awake at the Wheel by Berndt Sellheim. Please join us for a drink, and help us celebrate the arrival of two great books.

Opera by Stuart Cooke

'Approaching Cooke’s Opera, my nomadic antennae twitch with the pleasures of ‘a double shudder’: the recognition of an elegantly contemporary music, and the discovery of a different, southerly meridian. The play with ordered forms is wonderfully defeated, exceeded, flooded by an enriched, vibrating language that is always many. The thought it proposes is a ‘linguistic procreat’ of major dimensions.' Pierre Joris

Stuart Cooke was born in Sydney in 1980, and grew up there and in Hobart. He travels often, particularly in Latin America, where he has lived for a number of years. Widely published as a poet, critic and translator, he now lives on the Gold Coast and lectures at Griffith University. Opera is his second book of poems.

Awake at the Wheel by Berndt Sellheim

From the backroads of the Australian outback to the icy streets of Paris winter, these dynamic poems traverse geographies, languages and techniques. Marked by a subtle probing of the metaphysical layerings that unde pin human experience, this exploration returns again and again to the concrete details of everyday happenings. Drawing equally on moments of joy and loss, shifting from comic and bawdy bohemianism to introspective sensory envelopment, Awake at the Wheel evokes a dynamic and fragile world. This fragility is an insistent theme, both in terms of human mortality and ecological crisis. These poems travel across a beautiful eart, through mental and spiritual zones bleached by consumer capitalism, and through country ravaged by mining, passing amongst the ghosts of those who have gone before, the spirits of loved ones, and of cultural and literary inheritance. This is a collection of playful, innovative and imaginative poems, driven by a refined and attentive musicality, brimming with possibility and surprise.


 

Carmel Bird - Family Skeleton

When: Tuesday 15 November, 6.30pm

 
Where: at The Richmond Library, 415 Church St, Richmond, VIC 3121

 

 



 
Acclaimed Australian author Carmel Bird talks about her writing and her new book, Family Skeleton.

From inside her Toorak mansion, Margaret, matriarch and widow of Edmund Rice O’Day of O’Day Funerals, secretly surveys her family in the garden. With elegant wit and compassion, Bird delivers a novel of dark comedy, mystery and scandal. Family Skeleton examines the heart of a family that has for generations been engaged in dark business.

Free event, but bookings essential. You do not need to bring a ticket with you to this event. Click here to book.

Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.


Book launch: Glasshouses by Stuart Barnes

When: Wednesday 16 November, 6.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
Join us for the launch of Glasshouses by Stuart Barnes.

Stuart Barnes is one of Australia’s most talented poets and a rising star. He won the prestigious Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize for Poetry last year with this finely crafted collection as an unpublished manuscript.

Glasshouses’ poems illuminate city and coastal life. They sweep across Stuart’s mental landscapes and allude to a deep engagement with both classical and contemporary culture, seeming to orchestrate an eclectic and original music.

trumpeting
through blood &
bone the glasshouse’s
yellow stars

Being full of extraordinary imagery and inventive twists and turns, the poems curate a wondrous treasury of the new and imagined. With wisdom and intelligence, however, Stuart maintains a balance between attention and adventure in order to give the collection coherence and accessibility. Each poem can be read at many levels.

Stuart is following in the distinguished tradition of the Queensland poets who have won the Thomas Shapcott prize before him, among them David Stavanger, Sarah Holland-Batt, Felicity Plunkett and Krissy Kneen.


 

 

The Morning Bell - live podcast with Briohny Doyle

When: Wednesday 9 November, 7pm

 
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 9 November is Briohny Doyle. Briohny is a Melbourne-based writer and academic. Her debut novel, The Island Will Sink, is the first book published by The Lifted Brow.

Briohny’s work has appeared in publications like The Lifted Brow, The Age, Overland, Going Down Swinging and Meanjin, among others, and she has performed her work at the Sydney Festival and at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

Her first book of non-fiction, Adult Fantasy (Scribe Publications, 2017), will explore the cultural underpinnings of adulthood.

http://www.briohny-doyle.com/the-island-will-sink


 

Sami Shah: Fire Boy - Talk, reading and signing session

When: Thursday 3 November, 6.30pm

 
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
Come and listen to Sami talk about his inspirations for the book, read a creepy excerpt, and sign copies!

A boy who is half-human, half-djinn, growing up in one of the most violent cities in the world. That's the story that NSW Premier's Award nominated writer Sami Shah tells us in FIRE BOY. It's a book with Islamic mythology, urban horror, and real-world corruption, that Maxine Beneba Clarke called, "An imagination explosion".


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast with Steven Amsterdam

When: Wednesday 19 October, 7pm

 
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 26 October is Steven Amsterdam. Steven was born in New York City and has worked as a map editor, producer's assistant, and a pastry chef. Since 2003, he has lived in Melbourne, where he is a writer and palliative care nurse. His fiction and non-fiction has appeared in The Age, Conde Nast Traveller, Meanjin, The Monthly, Salon, Sleepers Almanac, and The Virginia Quarterly Review, as well as other journals and anthologies.

His debut novel, Things We Didn't See Coming, won The Age Book of the Year in Australia and was longlisted for The Guardian First Book Award. His second book, What the Family Needed, was longlisted for the International IMPAC Prize and shortlisted for the Encore Award. His new novel is The Easy Way Out.

Steven has been a fellow at Varuna-The Writers House, a resident at Rosebank and the Booranga Writers Centre, and a recipient of a grant from the Australia Council. He has run workshops or seminars from Capetown to Edinburgh. And, thanks to the Italian publisher of What the Family Needed, he once appeared in Uomo Vogue.

Website: http://www.stevenamsterdam.com


 

A Matter of Trust: Writing Sexual Abuse

When: Monday 17 October, 6.15pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre. Free event, bookings essential

 



 
In 2013, Joanne McCarthy from the Newcastle Herald received a Gold Walkley Award for her reporting on the sexual abuse cover-up in the Hunter Valley Region. Accepting the award, she thanked the survivors, who had placed their trust in her as a journalist, and in their local paper. ‘People who have every reason in the world not to trust – they trusted us,’ she said.

When it comes to writing and reporting, there aren’t many subjects as sensitive or painful as that of sexual abuse. In this discussion, we’ll hear from two writers who have broached this topic in their work: McCarthy, whose investigations led to the royal commission into institutional child sexual abuse and Manny Waks, author of Who Gave You Permission?, a memoir of the abuse he suffered at the ultra-orthodox Yeshivah Centre Melbourne. Waks has worked as a victim advocate and his research culminated in a public hearing into Australian Jewish institutions at the royal commission.

Hosted by Trauma-scapes author Maria Tumarkin, the pair will discuss the processes and ramifications of this difficult but essential work: interviewing survivors and perpetrators, the challenges of trust and verification and the frustrations of institutional cover-up.

This discussion includes topics that some attendees may find confronting. Audience questions from this event will not be recorded and published.

Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

 


 

Sports Writers Festival: explores politics, integrity, equality and more...

The Brunswick Street Bookstore is the official bookseller for the Sports Writers Festival.

When: October 14 -19th

 
Where: Various locations - check website for details

 



 
Now in its second year, the Sports Writers Festival celebrates sport through the written word.

Sport expresses the human condition, it’s about ethics, money, power, politics, identity and culture. The festival brings together esteemed journalists, writers and readers who share a passion for sport and great writing and is a highly anticipated feature of the Melbourne literary and sporting calendar. Held in sport and art mad Melbourne, with a special event in Sydney the annual Sports Writers Festival, runs from 14–19 October.


The Sports Writers Festival will open with Martin Flanagan, esteemed journalist for The Age and Fairfax Media, exploring the issue of sport and politics. The closing event will feature David Walsh, Sunday Times journalist and author of the best selling 'Seven Deadly Sins', sharing the journey of his pursuit of the truth about Lance Armstrong, and the aftermath of his exposé of the now-disgraced cyclist.


Festival creator and curator Francis Leach (pictured above) will host the conversation with multi-award winner Walsh, and pays credit to the bigger picture of what he’s achieved.


‘With his work exposing Lance Armstrong, David Walsh helped rescue cycling and won a fantastic victory for integrity in sport,’ said Leach.


Leach and Walsh will share their conversation with audiences in both Melbourne and Sydney, giving Sydneysiders their first taste of what the Sports Writers Festival has to offer.


Flanagan’s opening night address will be another first – the inaugural Festival oration – and Leach is adamant that there is no one better suited for the honour.


‘Martin Flanagan taps into the soul of Australian sport like no one else. He helps us understand who we are by the way we play the games we love,’ said Leach. ‘This is bound to be compelling.’


Complementing these two events, a host of Australian and international guests will provide insight into topics including the rise of women’s sport, Australian sports writers as celebrities, the art of long form sports writing, and the US sports writing scene. The program provides a notable expansion on last November’s first outing for the Festival, which consisted of a single day of events.


‘We're thrilled to be bringing together such a diverse, challenging and exciting program of events,’ said Leach.

Most events will take place at the Melbourne Town Hall, in the heart of the city. For full program details of the 2016 Sports Writers Festival, and to book tickets, visit www.sportswritersfestival.com.au.


 

 

The Morning Bell - live podcast with Brooke Maggs

When: Wednesday 12 October, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin, Luke Manly and
Ian Laking, who are up and coming Melbourne writers, and arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 12 October is Brooke Maggs. Brooke is an independent writer, narrative designer and producer based in Melbourne, Australia.

She is working with The Voxel Agents as a writer, narrative designer and producer for The Gardens Between, a gorgeous adventure puzzle game with no text or speech and keeps a development blog for this project on tumblr. She is also the narrative designer on Earthlight, a virtual reality game about the wonders and perils of space, which is being developed by Opaque Multimedia.

Recently named in the top 100 most influential women in games, Brooke has talked about games and writing fiction on a range of panels at festivals and industry conventions. She has over eight years of experience teaching user experience design, communications, game studies, project management and cultural studies at university level.

She recently wrote an explanatory piece on game writing for The Conversation and ArtsHub and continues to write about her experiences in this field. Brooke writes research papers on the importance of games and play in creative writing and the links between digital literature and traditional literature.

Her short stories have been published in the crime anthology, The One That Got Away,  and have been highly commended for the Scarlet Stiletto Award. She was awarded a Residential Fellowship at the Varuna House for the development of her speculative fiction novel.

She enjoys surfing, running and questing for the best smashed avocado in Melbourne.


website: http://www.brookemaggs.com/

 


 

A CONVERSATION WITH TIM WINTON

When: Friday 7 October at 6:30pm


Where: at Fitzroy Town Hall, 201 Napier St, Fitzroy


Presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust, Yarra Libraries & The Brunswick Street Bookstore

Tickets: Free – Bookings Essential: clike here to book BOOKED OUT SORRY


 

Wilder Beasts: The Global Scary and Supernatural

When: Tuesday 13 September


Where: at The Wheeler Centre. SORRY BOOKED OUT



 
We’ve seen so many werewolves in the last decade that they’re starting to look a little, well, house-trained.

With the recent explosion in popularity of genre fiction, many of the loathsome figures of western mythology and pop culture are losing their scare-factor. Are vampires and zombies still lurking in the shadows of your imagination? Please. You can do so much worse.

Enter Sami Shah, whose fantasy/horror novel, Fire Boy, is set in Karachi, Pakistan, and is riddled with soul-stealing djinns (shape-shifting demon/genies made of smokeless fire) and various other nightmarish creatures from Muslim mythology. Tired of the mainstay preternatural creatures of the western imagination, Sami has chosen to write of the mythical demons that haunted his own childhood. ‘My monsters are not yours,’ he says.

Join Sami and the panel for a broader, spookier discussion of genre fiction from across the world. What creepy spirits lurk under Malaysian, Moroccan and Mexican beds? Do demons and monsters share similar qualities across the world? Or do their powers reflect something of the culture of their origin?

Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.


 Zoe Morrison in conversation with Anne Manne

When: Wednesday 14 September, 6.30pm


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, click here to book.

 

This event is sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.



 
Framed as a memoir, Music and Freedom is a cleverly crafted literary debut and the sheer brilliance of Morrison’s prose is a delight to read. By turns heart-breaking and hilarious, this is a beautiful meditation on morality, love, faith, happiness and the transformative power of music and love to set us free.

Join Zoe, in conversation with journalist and social philosopher, Anne Manne, in exploring the novel’s themes and issues. 

 


The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 14 September, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guests on Wednesday 14 September are Katie Found & Sarah Vickery: http://www.catherineandkatherine.com/team/


Disability in Australia: Graeme Innes in conversation with Sally Warhaft

When: Tuesday 20 September, 6.15pm


Where: at the Wheeler Centre. Free event, bookings essential. Click here to book.



 
‘I have never accepted the concept of “lifters” and “leaners”’, Graeme Innes has said. ‘We all move from one role to the other dozens of times a day.’

Innes made this remark during a blistering National Press Club speech in 2014, as the outgoing federal disability discrimination commissioner. The notion of ‘lifters’ and ‘leaners’ entered the Australian political lexicon via former Treasurer Joe Hockey, but it’s an old concept, and one that Innes has fought against for much of his life.

Born blind, Innes was determined from an early age to pursue a fulfilling and demanding career. His new book, Finding a Way, describes his early life as well as the highs and lows of that career – as a lawyer, mediator, company director and commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission, working on issues relating to race, disability and same-sex discrimination.

In conversation with Sally Warhaft, Innes will reflect on his personal and professional achievements and discuss the state of disability policy in Australia today. What’s the future of the National Disability Insurance Scheme? And is our society getting better at understanding the potential, as well as the needs, of people with disabilities?

 


 

BOOK LAUNCH: Digital Photography and Everyday Life

When: Thursday 8 September, 6pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please click here to RSVP

 

 

Please join us for the launch of  Digital Photography and Everyday Life, co-edited by DERC’s Edgar Gómez Cruz and Asko Lehmuskallio. Dr Daniel Palmer (Monash University) will open the launch at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

Digital Photography and Everyday Life: Empirical studies on material visual practices explores the role that digital photography plays within everyday life.

With contributors from ten different countries and backgrounds in a range of academic disciplines - including anthropology, media studies and visual culture - this collection takes a uniquely broad perspective on photography by situating the image-making process in wider discussions on the materiality and visuality of photographic practices, and exploring these through empirical case studies.

By focusing on material visual practices, the book presents a comprehensive overview of some of the main challenges digital photography is bringing to everyday life. It explores how the digitization of photography has wide-reaching impact on the use of the medium, as well as on the kinds of images that can be produced and the ways in which camera technology is developed. The exploration goes beyond mere images to think about cameras, mediations and technologies as key elements in the development of visual digital cultures.

Edgar Gómez Cruz is a Vice-Chancellor Research Fellow at RMIT, Melbourne. He has published widely on a number of topics relating to digital culture, ethnography, and photography. His recent publications include the book From Kodak Culture to Networked Image: An Ethnography of Digital Photography Practices (2012). Current research investigates screen cultures and creative practices, which is funded through RCUK and Vice Chancellor research grants.

Asko Lehmuskallio is Chair of the ECREA TWG Visual Culture and founding member of the Nordic Network for Digital Visuality. As researcher at the Universities of Tampere and Siegen, he specialises in visual culture, mediated human action and networked cameras. Recent books include Pictorial Practices in a "Cam Era": Studying non-professional camera use(2012) and #snapshot: Cameras amongst us (co-ed, 2014).

 


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 31 August, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 17 August is Laura Elizabeth Woollett. Laura was born and raised in Perth, Western Australia. She moved to Melbourne after high school and, in 2012, completed an honours degree in creative writing at the University of Melbourne. Her first novel, The Wood of Suicides, was written while she was an undergraduate, and concerns a teacher-student relationship. It was published in the US in early 2014. The same year, she was awarded a Wheeler Centre/Readings Foundation Hot Desk Fellowship and the John Marsden/Hachette Prize for Fiction. In 2015, she was chosen as one of Melbourne Writers Festival’s ‘30 Under 30’. She is currently at work on her second novel, Beautiful Revolutionary, about a young counterculture couple who become involved with Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple in late ’60s California.

Website: https://lauraelizabethwoollett.com/

 


 

Better Reading: interview with Liam Pieper

When: Friday 19 August, 11.30am


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Better Reading's next weekend read is Liam Pieper's The Toymaker. Come and listen Liam being interviewed live at the Brunswick Street Bookstore, and pick up a signed copy of The Toymaker if you don't already have one!

From its opening pages The Toymaker chips away at the story of a family’s survival, each masterful stroke undercutting preconceptions to reveal layers of secrets and misdeeds that, slice by slice, peel back to humanity’s greatest crime: the Holocaust.

Adam Kulakov is the destructive, self-involved scion of a successful toy company, Sarah & Mitty – founded by his grandfather Arkady and now almost single-handedly run by Adam’s capable and stoic wife, Tess. Adam tries, and constantly fails, to be more like his urbane Russian grandfather – a witty, bright and resourceful man who weathered the horrors of Auschwitz, married a young Jewish survivor and built a thriving business based on the original dolls, which had been carved to lighten the lives of children in the very darkest of places.

Now his grandson’s risk-taking behaviour – including an affair with an underage schoolgirl – seem poised to tear down everything Arkady has built. But as Tess uncovers a trail of embezzled company funds, and Arkady’s failing health exposes him to the terrors of his past, it seems there may be even darker things to contend with.

Liam Pieper deftly guides readers beyond the carefully constructed narrative of the Kulakov family, through an increasingly disturbing labyrinth of lies, betrayal and the very basest of human impulses. And his scrutiny is far ranging – straying from the grubby peccadillos of a privileged man-child to the dubious ethics of cheap outsourced labour and the impossible dilemma of those forced into the death camps’ notorious Sonderkommando units.

Pieper pulls apart each character until they reveal the stuff of which they are really made. And, in the end, nothing is as it seems. The Toymaker is a clever, haunting read, each well-crafted line drawing the reader inexorably to its final, chilling conclusion.

Liam Pieper is Melbourne-based writer and journalist. His darkly witty memoir, The Feel-Good Hit of the Year, was shortlisted for the National Biography Award and the Ned Kelly Best True Crime award. He has also penned a collection of humorous essays, Mistakes Were Made, published as a Penguin Special. He was co-recipient of the 2014 M Literary Award, winner of the 2015 Geoff Dean Short Story Prize and the inaugural creative resident of the UNESCO City of Literature of Prague. The Toymaker is his first novel.

 


 

 

NEW WORKS ON PAPER - poets and makers in conversation with Antonia Pont

When: Saturday 13 August, 4.15pm for 4.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore, upstairs.

 
3 pairs of artists were set the task of working alongside each other on solo projects.
They’ve had 5 weeks, and will read and share their creations, as well as discuss the process - its boons and misses - this coming Saturday 13 August, at 4.30pm. Free entry.

Lisa Gorton | Skye Baker | Kent MacCarter | Leah Muddle | Campbell Thomson | Rosalind McFarlane

Come along and hear from experienced poets and artists, making new things, in new ways, in new company.

Supported by Deakin University - School of Communication and Creative Arts, and Meniscus Journal.


 

 

BOOK LAUNCH: Screen Ecologies

When: Thursday 4 August, 6.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please click here to RSVP

 

 

 

 

Please join us at the Brunswick Street Bookstore to celebrate the launch of our new publication, Screen Ecologies, by Larissa Hjorth, Sarah Pink, Kristen Sharp and Linda Williams. The evening will be opened by RMIT Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice President, Professor Paul Gough.

Images of environmental disaster and degradation have become part of our everyday media diet. This visual culture focusing on environmental deterioration represents a wider recognition of the political, economic, and cultural forces that are responsible for our ongoing environmental crisis. And yet efforts to raise awareness about environmental issues through digital and visual media are riddled with irony, because the resource extraction, manufacturing, transportation, and waste associated with digital devices contribute to environmental damage and climate change.

Screen Ecologies examines the relationship of media, art, and climate change in the Asia-Pacific region—a key site of both environmental degradation and the production and consumption of climate-aware screen art and media.

Screen Ecologies shows how new media and visual artists provide alternative ways for understanding the entanglements of media and the environment in the Asia-Pacific. It investigates such topics as artists’ exploration of alternative ways to represent the environment; regional stories of media innovation and climate change; the tensions between amateur and professional art; the emergence of biennials, triennials, and new arts organizations; the theme of water in regional art; new models for networked collaboration; and social media’s move from private to public realms. A generous selection of illustrations shows a range of artist’s projects.

 


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 3 August, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 3 August is Toni Jordan. Toni is the author of four novels. The international best-seller Addition (2008), was a Richard and Judy Bookclub pick and was longlisted for the Miles Franklin award. Fall Girl (2010) was published internationally and Nine Days (2012) was awarded Best Fiction at the 2012 Indie Awards, was shortlisted for the ABIA Best General Fiction award and was named in Kirkus Review’s top 10 Historical Novels of 2013. Her latest novel is Our Tiny, Useless Hearts (2016).

Website: http://www.tonijordan.com/

 

BOOK LAUNCH: After The Carnage

When: Sunday 31 July, 4pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, click here to RSVP

 

 

 

Please join UQP and The Brunswick Street Bookstore for the launch of Tara June Winch's highly anticipated After The Carnage.

Tony Birch will launch the book.

A single mother resorts to extreme measures to protect her young son. A Nigerian student undertakes a United Nations internship in the hope of a better future. A recently divorced man starts a running group with members of an online forum for recovering addicts.

Ranging from New York to Istanbul, from Pakistan to Australia, these unforgettable stories chart the distances in their characters' lives - whether they have grown apart from the ones they love, been displaced from their homeland, or are struggling to reconcile their dreams with reality. A collection of prodigious depth and variety, After the Carnage marks the impressive evolution of one of our finest young writers.

 


BOOK LAUNCH and Free Workshops: Flying Penguins by Jackie Case

When: Workshop 1: Wednesday 20 July, 6.30pm

Workshop 2: Thursday 21 July, 12.30pm

Book Launch: Thursday 21 July, 6.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free events, please click here to RSVP

 

 

 

Last showing in Melbourne in 2014, fine artist Jackie Case has since exhibited in London, Paris, Singapore, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and across The United States.  Her humorous yet delicate art works are highly sort after by collectors across the globe. Last year in Seattle alone, her work sold out within hours of opening night.  For one day only, The Brunswick Street Bookstore will have on display a selection of her works before they head off to Seattle in the hope of repeating last year’s phenomenal success.
 
Sharing her creative process, Jackie has penned a unique and insightful methodology FLYING PENGUINS.
 
This book is designed to generate original ideas & artistic direction across all creative platforms. And incidentally explains how Jackie went from showing her work in local cafés to her gallery represented solo exhibition in New York. With every purchase of FLYING PENGUINS, you will automatically go into the draw to pick an original Jackie Case piece of art work on display from the works assigned to Seattle.
 
Other prizes include a signed and framed sketch, and a limited edition signed first print edition of FLYING PENGUINS. Two FLYING PENGUINS workshops will also be held at the store. Jackie will teach you how to make something  truly original.

 


The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 20 July, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 20 July is Leanne Hall. Leanne is the author of two novels for young adults: This Is Shyness and its sequel, Queen of the Night. Leanne Hall was born in Melbourne and has lived there most of her life. She began her writing career with short stories, some of which have been published in Sleepers Almanac, Meanjin and Best Australian Stories. She won The Text Prize in 2009 with her debut novel This Is Shyness. Her most recent novel is Iris and the Tiger.

Website: http://thelongblinks.com/ 

 


 

 

 BOOK LAUNCH: The Toymaker by Liam Pieper


When: Thursday 30 June, 6.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please email us to RSVP.

 

 

 

 

Join us for the Melbourne launch of The Toymaker by Liam Pieper.

'Hugely memorable, The Toymaker is an unflinching examination of the dark instinct for survival that lies in all of us.’ Hannah Kent, author of Burial Rites

A person is defined by the secrets they keep . . .


Adam Kulakov likes his life. He's on the right side of middle age; the toy company he owns brightens the lives of children around the world; and he has more money than he can ever spend, a wife and child he adores, and as many mistresses as he can reasonably hide from them.
And he is not the only one with secrets. In 1944, Adam's grandfather, Arkady, was imprisoned in Auschwitz and given an impossible choice. Now, as he's coming to the end of his life, he has to keep the truth from his family, and hold back the crushing memories of his time with one of history's greatest monsters.


As a mistake threatens to bring Adam's world tumbling down around him, the past reaches for Arkady. Everything he's spent a lifetime building will be threatened, as will everything Adam and his family think they know of the world.


Bold, dark and compelling, The Toymaker is a novel about privilege, fear and the great harm we can do when we are afraid of losing what we hold dear.

‘Pieper writes superbly. The Toymaker gives immediate and absorbing pleasure, and has similarities to J M Coetzee’s Disgrace in terms of the main character’s wretched search for redemption, both for himself and for humanity.’ Books+Publishing


Across The Seas - Australia’s Response to Refugees
Klaus Neumann in conversation with Arnold Zable

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust


When: Tuesday 28 June, 7pm

 

 


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: Click here to book a ticket

 

Klaus Neumann’s recent book, Across The Seas; Australia’s Response to Refugees, explores the ways in which politicians have approached asylum-seeker issues in the past, and aims to inspire more creative thinking about current refugee and asylum-seeker policy.

Klaus Neumann is a historian based at Swinburne University’s Institute for Social Research. His 2006 book In the Interest of National Security won the John and Patricia Ward History Prize, while his Refuge Australia: Australia’s Humanitarian Record (2004) won the Australian Human Rights Commission’s 2004 Human Rights Award for Non-Fiction.

Arnold Zable is a highly acclaimed novelist, storyteller, educator and human rights advocate, whose books include Jewels and Ashes, The Fig Tree, Café Scheherazade, Scraps of Heaven, Sea of Many Returns and Violin Lessons. His new work, The Fighter, is published in May.


BOOK LAUNCH: Music and Freedom by Zoe Morrison


When: Sunday 26 June, 3pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please email us to RSVP.

 

 

 

Join us for the Melbourne launch of Music and Freedom by Zoe Morrison, a gripping and beautifully written novel in the tradition of Elizabeth is Missing and the work of Elizabeth Harrower.

I have no use for forgiveness, not yet. But other ideas like that,
kindness, for example, I think that is fundamental. Resurrection;
I like that too. And love, of course, love, love, love.

Alice Murray learns to play the piano aged three on an orange orchard in rural Australia. Recognising her daughter's gift, her mother sends Alice to boarding school in the bleak north of England, and there Alice stays for the rest of her childhood. Then she's offered a scholarship to the Royal College of Music in London, and on a summer school in Oxford she meets Edward, an economics professor who sweeps her off her feet.

Alice soon finds that Edwards is damaged, and she's trapped. She clings to her playing and to her dream of becoming a concert pianist, until disaster strikes. Increasingly isolated as the years unravel, eventually Alice can't find it in herself to carry on. Then she hears the most beautiful music from the walls of her house …

This novel's love story is that of a woman who must embrace life again if she is to survive. Inspiring and compelling, it explores the dark terrain of violence and the transformative powers of music and love.

 


 

 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 8 June, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 8 June is Andrew McDonald. Andrew is a Melbourne writer and author of books for young readers. In 2009 he published his first middle-grade novel, The Greatest Blogger in the World and Son of Death is his second novel, a black comedy about grim reaping, family responsibility and rock’n’roll.  Andrew has a degree in Media Studies and is a graduate of RMIT’s Professional Writing and Editing course. He has worked in bookshops in Melbourne and London. He is a regular presenter on the schools circuit and has appeared at various writers festivals. In 2011 he was a co-judge of the Young Adult category of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards.

 

The Lucky Country? – Reinventing Australia: Professor Ian Lowe AO in conversation with Glyn Davis AC

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust


When: Tuesday 24 May, 7pm


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: Click here to book a ticket

 

Join us for the Melbourne launch of one of the most significant books of our age on the future of Australia, by one of our leading climate change scientists.

In his new release, The Lucky Country? Reinventing Australia, award-winning academic and scientist Ian Lowe questions Australia’s identity, and what kind of future we want for our descendants. Inspired by Donald Horne’s iconic 1967 polemic The Lucky Country, he turns his expert eye to consider where Australia is now, and our dire geographical, social, economic and environmental future if we do not seek an alternative.

Professor Ian Lowe is emeritus professor of science, technology and society at Griffith University, and adjunct professor at Sunshine Coast and Flinders Universities. He is the author of more than 500 publications and of 20 books, including Bigger or Better? Australia’s population debate (2012) and A Voice of Reason: Reflections on Australia (2010).

His contributions to environmental science have won him a Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize, the Prime Minister’s Environment Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement, and he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2001 for services to science, technology and the environment.

He has served on many advisory bodies to all levels of government, and was president of the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) from 2004–2014. In 2015 Lowe was appointed to the Expert Advisory Committee for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission in South Australia.

Professor Glyn Davis has been Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Melbourne since January 2005, and is Professor of Political Science in the Faculty of Arts.

Professor Davis publishes on public policy, and is co-author of The Australian Policy Handbook, now in its fifth edition. In recognition of his position as a leading academic at the centre of Australia's tertiary education transformation, he presented the 2010 Boyer lectures The Republic of Learning: higher education transforms Australia.He has also served Chairman of Universitas 21, a global network of leading international universities, and a Director of the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies at King's College London. Professor Davis is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, a Companion in the Order of Australia, and a Director of the Melbourne Theatre Company, the Grattan Institute, the LH Martin Institute and Asialink.

 



The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 25 May, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 25 May is Ian Laking. Ian is a young author from New Zealand who writes fantasy stories for young adults and children.His style is contemporary, with elements of classic fiction, and his current series of detective stories is an introduction to the world of the Empire. Laking loves a great twist, and every story contains unexpected turns to keep readers wanting more.

 Website: https://ihlaking.com/

 


 

 A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe: Book Launch

When: Satruday 14 May, 5pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, click here to RSVP



 
UQP and The Brunswick Street Bookstore warmly invite you to the launch of A Loving, Faithful Animal -- the much-anticipated debut novel from one of Australia’s most gifted young writers.

Through the beautifully realised voices of Ru and her family, Josephine Rowe tells a powerful story of growing up, of challenging fate, and of the scars left behind by those we love.

‘Rowe’s lyrical writing–which is almost prose-poetry at times–is utterly compelling. This is a striking and highly original novel for readers of Australian literary fiction.’ Books+Publishing, four-and-a-half star review

Paddy O'Reilly, author of Peripheral Vision, will launch the book.

Refreshments will be served. Free event, but RSVPs appreciated: click here to RSVP

 


Digital Ethnography: Book Launch

When: Thursday 12 May, 6pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 
Join DERC as they launch their latest publication Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practice. Dean of the RMIT School of Media and Communication, Prof. Martyn Hook will open the event.

This sharp, innovative book champions the rising significance of ethnographic research on the use of digital resources around the world. It contextualises digital and pre-digital ethnographic research and demonstrates how the methodological, practical and theoretical dimensions are increasingly intertwined.

Digital ethnography is central to our understanding of the social world; it can shape methodology and methods, and provides the technological tools needed to research society. The authoritative team of authors clearly set out how to research localities, objects and events as well as providing insights into exploring individuals’ or communities’ lived experiences, practices and relationships.

The book
Defines a series of central concepts in this new branch of social and cultural research
Challenges existing conceptual and analytical categories
Showcases new and innovative methods
Theorises the digital world in new ways
Encourages us to rethink pre-digital practices, media and environments
This is the ideal introduction for anyone intending to conduct ethnographic research in today’s digital society.

Authors
Sarah Pink - RMIT University
Heather Horst - RMIT University
John Postill - RMIT University
Larissa Hjorth - RMIT University
Tania Lewis - RMIT University
Jo Tacchi - RMIT University

 

 


 

Toni Jordan in conversation with Jo Case

 

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust


When: Tuesday 10 May, 7pm


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event

 

Join us for an evening with Toni Jordan and Jo Case who will discuss Toni’s highly anticipated new release, Our Tiny, Useless Hearts, which has been described as “a highly entertaining romp through the complexities of modern relationships; a classic farce in the style of Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, complete with physical comedy, exaggerated situations and a spot of class commentary in the form of suburban satire” (Books + Publishing).

Toni Jordan is the author of four novels, including the international bestseller Addition (2008) which was longlisted for the Miles Franklin award. Fall Girl (2010) has been optioned for film, and Nine Days was awarded Best Fiction at the 2012 Indie Awards.

Jo Case is the Program Manager at Melbourne Writers Festival. Before this, she was the Wheeler Centre’s senior writer/editor. Her first book, Boomer and Me: A memoir of motherhood, and Asperger’s was published in Australia and the UK in 2013.

She has been books editor of The Big Issue, associate editor of Kill Your Darlings, deputy editor of Australian Book Review and editor of Readings Monthly. Her writing has been published in the Australian, the Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, the Monthly, Best Australian Stories, the Sleepers Almanac, Australian Book Review and other publications.

 


Brunswick Street All Out

When: Sunday 1 May - all day
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

Live Drawing at Brunswick Street Bookstore:
Come and watch fine artist, author and Illustrator Elise Hurst draw the portrait of a giant Rabbit on our front window. Come down to spend some time watching Elise work her magic!
11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

An Art Class with Tull:
Tull will be reading from his book, What Happens Next? and will be teaching children how to draw some of the characters from his book using simple geometric shapes, numbers and alphabets. Learn to draw a bear, a fox, a hare and even an ogre too! And to finish off the activity, everyone will get to create their own stories based on the catchy phrase, “What Happens Next?”. Suitable for children aged 5 onwards.
To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

11:30 AM to 12:30 PM

Imaginarium ARTernoon with Elise Hurst and Tull Suwannakit:
Acclaimed children’s book author and illustrator, Elise Hurst will be joined by Tull Suwannakit in a collaborated art workshop, Imaginarium ARTernoon.  Tull will teach children how to draw some of the characters from his book, What Happens Next? And Elise will demonstrate how to turn a picture into an imaginative world of wonders based on her book,Imagine a City. Suitable for children aged 5 onwards.

To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

1:30 PM to 2:30 PM

Character Design Workshop:
In this workshop, Tull will guide you through the practical creative process of character design used in picture books illustration.  Participants create their own unique characters using stretch, squash and transformation techniques, as well as bringing out their own style of illustration. Illustration elements of line, form, motion and expression are also explored in this workshop. Suitable for adults aged 18 onwards. The workshop is designed to suit participants with all levels of art skills.

To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

Open House at the Bookstore:
The Brunswick Street Bookstore cordially invites you to an open-house viewing of our newly available first-floor space. Visit for a chat and a glass of wine with owner Peter Mews, and let us know your thoughts. We're looking for ideas, feedback and expressions of interest regarding this bright and accessible area, which would lend itself equally well to use as an office, studio, retail showroom or gallery space.
5:00 PM to 6:00 PM 

IG - https://www.instagram.com/brunswickstreetallout/

FB - https://www.facebook.com/brunswickstreetallout/?fref=ts

www - http://brunswickstreetallout.com.au/

Event - https://www.facebook.com/events/208340636212633/

 


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 27 April, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 26 April is Dr. Sean McMullen. Author of the acclaimed cyberpunk/steampunk Greatwinter Trilogy, Sean is one of Australia's top Science Fiction and Fantasy authors. Winning over a dozen awards (including multiple Analog Readers Awarda and a Hugo Award finalist), his work is a mixture of romance, invention and adventure, populated by strange and dynamic characters. The settings for Sean's work range from the Roman Empire, through Medieval Europe, to cities of the distant future. He is a musician, medievalist, star gazer, karate instructor, felineophile, and IT manager.

 


Six Under Eight: Madeleine West in conversation with Zoe Foster


When: Friday 29 April, 6.30pm


Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, RSVP essential

 

 

SIX UNDER EIGHT!!!

Join actor, author and Supermum MADELEINE WEST as she is joined in a one off conversation with her friend, the fabulous ZOE FOSTER BLAKE talking all things SIX UNDER EIGHT

Come along to the Brunswick Street Bookstore for some wine and nibbles and a good old natter about all things motherhood with two of  Melbourne’s favourite Mums.

Free event, RSVP essential: events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

SPACES LIMITED. BOOK FAST TO AVOID MISSING OUT!

Six Under Eight is a hilarious, insightful and moving diary, diving into the chaos of juggling kids’ birthday parties, bath time, lunchboxes, breastfeeding, house renovations, shopping lists, nappies, auditions, mastitis, mood swings, occasional glamour, teething and tantrums.

Interspersed with heartfelt, honest and witty diary entries, Madeleine offers her own parenting tips and insights based on her wealth of experience; from nursery purchases that have proved pointless to what you do actually need, preparing siblings for the arrival of new family members, getting the kids involved, getting enough sleep, serious illness in children, creating memories and how to be a part of your children’s day, even when you are not there.

Often chaotic, sometimes exasperating but never dull, Six Under Eight is the mother of all parenting diaries. In her warm, selfdeprecating style Madeleine shows what it takes to raise a large family and keep your sanity, wisdom and sense of humour somewhat intact.

 


The Art of Reading - Damon Young

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust


When: Tuesday 26 April, 6.30pm


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

Join us for this stimulating event to hear Damon discuss his latest release, The Art of Reading. Introduced by revered journalist and commentator, Jonathan Green, ABC presenter and Meanjin editor.

Dr Damon Young is a philosopher, author and commentator, with a reputation as a clear and witty communicator of ‘big ideas’. In 2013, he won the Australasian Association of Philosophy's media prize for his public writing and broadcasting. His books include How to Think About Exercise (2014, Pan Macmillan), Philosophy in the Garden (2013, MUP), and Distraction (2008, MUP).
Young is a popular ABC radio guest, and writes regularly for newspapers. He has also published short fiction, poetry and a children's book My Nanna is a Ninja (2014), and is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

In his new book, The Art of Reading (April 2016, MUP), he reveals the pleasures of this intimate pursuit through a rich sample of literature: from Virginia Woolf’s diaries to Batman comics. Devoting each chapter to a literary virtue - patience, curiosity, courage, pride, temperance, justice - the book celebrates the reader’s power: to turn shapes on a page into a lifelong adventure.

Tickets are free, but bookings are essential. Don't miss out!

Praise for The Art of Reading

‘A compelling riff on the best kind of reading—with unfettered curiosity and courage.’
—Hilary McPhee

‘A beautifully written and thoughtfully constructed ode to the inner worlds opened up by the page, and the role of reading in the discovery and development of the self. The Art of Reading is just what I needed to remind me I am neither alone—nor irrational—in my bibliophilia.’
—Tara Moss

 


Mietta’s Legacy - with Stephanie Alexander and Patricia O’Donnell

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust


When: Monday 11 April, 6.30pm


Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

 

Please join us to celebrate Mietta O’Donnell’s legacy and the new edition of  Mietta's Italian Family Recipes. Patricia and Stephanie will talk about their memories of Mietta, her influence on the growth of the Melbourne food and wine scene, and also discuss a few of the recipes and chapters in the book, followed by Q&A and book signing.

Mietta O'Donnell (1951-2001) was a greatly admired restauranteur and author, as well as a profoundly influential figure in the arts and cultural world. Mietta inspired people and ideas, not only about food, but also about the physical fabric and vibrancy of our city and its culture.

From the stage of her celebrated and iconic restaurant, Mietta’s, which she and her partner Tony Knox established and ran in Fitzroy and then in Alfred Place, Melbourne, Mietta orchestrated a salon where an astonishing range of art forms was performed - from comedy to art song, poetry to play readings, with music ranging from jazz to opera alongside forums for social and political issues. Her support for the arts and artists was recognised with a Green Room Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts in Melbourne.

Together, she and her partner, photographer Tony Knox, published a number of books, including Great Australian Chefs and their annual guide, Mietta's Best Australian Restaurants. Mietta’s Italian Family Recipes presents over 185 recipes, covering antipasto, soups, risotto, pasta, fish, meat, pizza and desserts, demonstrating the ways in which original Italian recipes can be re-interpreted to suit modern Australian life, ingredients and equipment. This new edition includes forewords by Mietta’s sister, Patricia O’Donnell, and by her partner, Tony Knox, as well as a publisher’s note and a selection of new photographs.

Stephanie Alexander AO is regarded as one of Australia’s great food educators. Her reputation has been earned through her thirty years as an owner-chef in several restaurants (for over 20 years Stephanie’s Restaurant was at the heart of everything culinary in Australia), as the author of 14 influential books and hundreds of articles about food matters, and for her ground breaking work in creating the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation. Everything Stephanie has achieved and worked towards has been driven by her desire to break down people’s anxieties about cooking, to emphasise the beauty of produce fresh from the garden, to demonstrate the pleasures of sharing around a table, so that more of us will choose to live a more joyful and healthier life. Stephanie’s fifth book, The Cook’s Companion is regarded as an Australian classic.

Patricia O’Donnell was a teacher and educational psychologist. From 1978-2002 Patricia was the owner and manager of the heritage listed Mietta’s Queenscliff Hotel after which she established the North Fitzroy Star Hotel, a much loved place for locals, writers and book groups. She was the initiator and deputy president of the Queenscliff Carnival of Words and host of the Queenscliff Music Festival. Patricia was a member of the Library Board of Victoria (1999-2008) and is currently a Board Member of the Abbotsford Convent Foundation, the Australian Art Orchestra, and the Mietta Foundation.

Doors open at 6.00pm.

Event sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.
Presented in partnership with Brunswick Street Bookstore and Black Inc.


Bookings essential.  There is no need to bring a ticket with you to this event.

 


Liberal Loyalties: Niki Savva on The Road to Ruin

When: Tuesday 29 March, 6.15pm


Where: at The Wheeler Centre. BOOKED OUT SORRY

 

Earlier this month, Niki Savva’s book on the political partnership of Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin sparked a flurry of press. There were attacks, counter-attacks, impassioned defences of the Abbott Government legacy – and just as vehement defences of long political and journalistic careers.

This Fifth Estate conversation offers a chance for a deeper dissection of the issues raised in the book – and in the media surrounding it – as well as a broader discussion of the trajectory of the Liberal Party. In The Road to Ruin: How Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin Destroyed Their Own Government, Savva argues that while the partnership between the former PM and his chief of staff was effective in opposition, it was catastrophic in government.

Join Sally Warhaft and senior member of the Canberra press gallery, Niki Savva, for a discussion of political partnerships, party loyalty, the looming election and the state of conservative politics in Australian today.

Niki Savva is one of the most senior correspondents in the Canberra Press Gallery. She was twice political correspondent on the Australian, and headed up the Canberra bureaus of both the Herald Sun and the Age. When family tragedy forced a career change, she became Peter Costello’s press secretary for six years and was then on John Howard’s staff for three. Her work has brought her into intimate contact with the major political players of the last 35 years. She is now a regular columnist for the Australian, and often appears on ABC TV’s The Insiders as well as on political panels on Sky.
Portrait of Sally Warhaft

Sally Warhaft is a Melbourne broadcaster, anthropologist and writer and the host of the Wheeler Centre’s live journalism series, The Fifth Estate, now in its fourth year. She is a former editor of The Monthly magazine and the author of the bestselling book Well May We Say: The Speeches that Made Australia.


 What's Up MuMu? by David Mackintosh

 
MuMu is not having a good day. Nothing can put things right. AND THAT'S THAT. Her best friend Lox knows her better than anyone, but does he have enough tricks up his sleeve to put things right?
A rattly rollercoaster of a story from award-winning author/illustrator David Mackintosh, this bright and witty story of friendship, patience and modern construction methods will have you wishing for a best friend like Lox.
The first 10 copies include a charming lapel badge hand-made by the artist. Hurry: ONLY 1 COPY LEFT!!


 


The Morning Bell - live podcast

When: Wednesday 16 March, 7pm


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore



 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday March 17th is George Ivanoff. George has written over 90 books for children and teenagers, including fiction and non-fiction. He has written school readers, library reference books, chapter books, novelettes, novels and even a short story collection. He has books on both the Victorian Premier’s and the NSW Premier’s Reading Challenge booklists.

 


Enemy: Ruth Clare in conversation with Cate Blake

When: Thursday 17 March


Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

A brutal, compelling and insightful memoir from an exciting new Australian talent.

Ruth Clare’s father was one of the 19,000 Australians whose birth date condemned them to give up the life they had planned so they could serve their country fighting in the Vietnam War.

In 1974, the year Ruth Clare was born, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) hadn’t been recognised as a condition. Growing up, the war and her father’s part in it, was rarely mentioned, “No one ever told me the way Dad behaved might have anything to do with a war. No one ever told me it wasn’t my fault”.

Ruth’s father returned a changed man: violent, controlling and unpredictable. Her first childhood memory is of him hitting her. When her parents’ marriage fell apart and he left for good, Ruth’s, mother descended into alcoholism. Her father’s volatility, followed by her mother’s absent parenting meant Ruth learned to parent herself. She made her own decisions and became fierce in the face of danger.
When Ruth became a mother herself, it forced her to confront the way her father had treated her, and to recognise how it had shaped her. Wanting to understand the experiences that had irrevocably altered her father, she met with other veterans and began learning their stories. What Ruth uncovered left her with a surprising empathy for the man who caused her so much pain and heartache. “It would always be part of my lifelong journey to accept that I did not have to be perfect to receive love. But in being more compassionate toward Dad, I had gained the unexpected bonus of being more accepting of myself.”

‘Ruth Clare brings history into the home with piercing intelligence, unflinching honesty and total, terrifying recall. By drawing a direct line from the violence of war to the brutality of domesticity, Enemy refuses to excuse the tormentor yet tries to understand the legacy of torment. I wanted this book to stop and I couldn’t put this book down.’  Clare Wright

Ruth Clare did a degree in biochemistry minoring in journalism before deciding to live her dream of becoming an actor. She landed roles on Neighbours and Blue Heelers as well as many commercials, but gave it all up to become a professional writer in 2004. She has written for magazines and created a range of educational materials as well as working as a copywriter for a wide range of business clients. Ruth was a finalist in the 2014 Cowley Literary Award for an abridged excerpt from Enemy.

Cate Blake is the Managing Editor for Penguin General at Penguin Random House Australia.

 

 


Outsider/Insider: Award winning authors George Megalogenis and Christos Tsiolkas in conversation on Australia's Second Chance, how we became comfortable in our migrant skin
 
Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust
When: Wednesday 9 March, 7-8pm
Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket
 
 

 
George Megalogenis is an author and journalist with three decades' experience in the media. His work examines the political, economic and social history of Australia. The Australian Moment won the 2013 Prime Minister's Literary Award for Non-fiction and the 2012 Walkley Award for Non-fiction, and formed the basis for the ABC documentary series Making Australia Great. He is also the author of Faultlines, The Longest Decade and Quarterly Essay 40: Trivial Pursuit – Leadership and the End of the Reform Era. In his new book, Australia’s Second Chance, he argues that throughout Australian history, high immigration has usually correlated with prosperity and an ability to survive economic downturn.
Christos Tsiolkas is the author of five novels including Loaded (which was made into the feature film Head-On), The Jesus Man and Dead Europe. Released in 2009, his novel The Slap won a slew of literary awards and was adapted into an award-winning ABC TV series. He is also a playwright, essayist and screen writer. His latest novel Barracuda, was published to rave reviews in late 2013 and became an instant bestseller.
 Presented in partnership with Penguin Random House, Fitzroy Library & The Brunswick Street Bookstore
 
 “In Australia’s Second Chance, George Megalogenis surveys Australian history from the First Fleet to the present and considers ways in which different waves of immigration have shaped the character of the nation. With characteristic lucidity, Megalogenis examines the connection between our collective prosperity and Australia’s tendency at different times either to embrace or resist migrants.”
 - James Ley, The Australian, Books of the Year 2015
 
 “Megalogenis has emerged as something of a polymath. He slaps history and politics and culture like mortar in and around his knowledge of economics and numbers to build compelling, even thrilling, theses about the country of his birth and where it stands in the world.”
 - Tony Wright, Saturday Age
 
“Tsiolkas is better than anyone else writing in Australia today at thinking about the affective pull and the sharp edges of communities: ethnicity, family, friendship, class, nation.”
- Tony Wright, Saturday Age Julianne Lamond, Sydney Review of Books
 


 

The Morning Bell - live podcast
When: Wednesday 2 March
Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 
The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday. The next guest on March 2nd is Catherine Bateson. Catherine is a poet and a writer for children and young adults. She has had three collections of poetry published and over a dozen books for younger readers and young adults. She has twice won the Children’s Book Council of Australia Book of the Year, Younger Writers, and been awarded Honours awards in both that category and the Young Adult category. In 2013 she was the recipient of an Australia Council Residential Fellowship and spent three months in Paris where she began the novel, Lisette’s Paris Notebook which will be published in January 2017 with Allen and Unwin. With Leonie Tyle, she runs Tyle&Bateson Publishing Services..

http://catherine-bateson.com/


 

 The Beat of Brunswick Street: Soundtracks for bibliophiles by DJ Andy Hazel
 
When: Saturday 27 February, 1-5pm
Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

Have you ever wanted the world to just disappear and music to almost, but not quite, be completely innocuous? Me too! Every day! A good book will trump a self-important man with a box of records and two turntables every time, right? Even an average book will. And yet...
Andy Hazel is playing music to browse by, read to, buy books with and occasionally Shazam while mouthing “God, this is brilliant!”. Soundtracks, minimal electronica, exotica, obscure dub ebook-themed pop.
Andy Hazel is a Tasmanian musician and Melbournian journalist. He works at The Saturday Paper, studies journalism at the University of Melbourne and plays in the bands The Paradise Motel and Hana Maru. Once, in a scene that almost defies credulity, he worked at a seal sanctuary in the North Sea where a shaman gave him a box of obscure Jamaican records muttering, “you may as well take them, I stole them all anyway”. Since then, he also plays records.
This event is part of THE BEAT OF BRUNSWICK STREET program: https://www.facebook.com/events/572870259538790/
 


Etgar Keret on his memoir Seven Good Years
When: Thursday 25 February, 6.15pm
Where: at The Wheeler Centre.

What’s it like to raise a child in Israel today, with war as a constant backdrop? That’s one of the questions Etgar Keret explores in The Seven Good Years – his new memoir charting the time between his son’s birth and his father’s death.

The book’s ruminations, like much of Keret’s writing, unfolds with poignancy and playfulness, wit and tenderness. A major voice in Israeli literature, the author is beloved for his wisdom, heart and surreal humour – qualities which have earned him fans including Clive James, Salman Rushdie and Gary Shteyngart, as well as regular appearances on This American Life and translations into 37 languages.

Keret visits Melbourne to discuss his diverse career – covering his short stories, radio journalism, film and TV, graphic novels and children’s books – as well as his personal essays in The Seven Good Years about family and fatherhood in Tel Aviv. Delve into creativity, conflict and black humour with one of Israel’s most celebrated writers at Deakin Edge.

Etgar Keret’s visit is supported by the Embassy of Israel.



 Arabella Forge: Nutrient Dense Food on a Shoestring
 
Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust
When: Tuesday 23 February, 6.30pm
Where: at The Fitzroy Library. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket
More and more people are interested in eating well and in understanding where their food comes from. But where to start? Organic, free-range, local, sustainable: the choices can be overwhelming and expensive.

Come along to hear Arabella Forge, nutritionist and food journalist, discuss her new book Nutrient-Dense Food on a Shoestring (an updated edition of her 2010 classic Frugavore) and share her hands-on, practical advice on how to develop a new way of living, proving that frugal eating can also be delicious and fun.

Arabella teaches regular cooking classes at CERES Environmental Park and Organic Wholefoods, focusing on traditional techniques. She has appeared at Slow Food forums and speaks frequently on radio about issues relating to food and health. Books will be available to purchase on the night.

 


  • The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 17 February

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
    It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

    The next guest on Wednesday 17 February is Dr Earl Livings. Dr Livings has published poetry and fiction in Australia and also Britain, Canada, the USA, and Germany. He also has read his work in many venues around Melbourne and in the USA, England, Ireland, and Wales. Earl has a PhD in Creative Writing and taught professional writing and editing for 17 years. His writing focuses on nature, mythology and the sacred and he is currently working on a Dark Ages novel and his next poetry collection. Earl lives in Box Hill with his wife and the seasonal owls, bats and lorikeets that love the trees around his home.


     

    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 3 February

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
    It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

    The next guest on Wednesday 14th October is Neil Rennison. Neil is the original founder of Tin Man Games and has worked in the games industry for over 13 years. Coming from a background in product design, Neil first started out as a 3D modeller and got his first games industry break working with Razorworks in the UK on a series of racing games. Working as a freelancer for a number of years, Neil then started Fraction Studios, a game art outsourcing and contracting specialist. Fraction closed its doors in 2011 so that Neil could concentrate fully on Tin Man Games and Gamebook Adventures. Neil  has had a number of articles published in 3D World magazine & PC Format, has dabbled in university lecturing and has given talks at gaming conventions and IGDA gatherings.  To date, he has worked on over 30 published games.

     


     

    Hope Farm: Peggy Frew in conversation with Peter Mews

     

    Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

    When: Wednesday 27 January, 6pm for 6.30pm

    Where: at The Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket


    Hope Farm is the highly acclaimed second novel from award-winning local author Peggy Frew. It is a masterful and devastatingly beautiful story about the broken bonds of childhood, and the enduring cost of holding back the truth. The Sunday Age described it as ‘a finely calibrated study of love, loss and belonging.’
    Peggy Frew's debut novel, House of Sticks, won the 2010 Victorian Premier's Literary Award for an unpublished manuscript. Her story Home Visit won The Age short story competition. She has been published in New Australian Stories 2, Kill Your Darlings, The Big Issue, and Meanjin. She is also a member of the critically acclaimed and award-winning Melbourne band Art of Fighting. Peter Mews is an author and co-owner of Brunswick Street Bookstore.

    ‘Peggy Frew is an amazing writer and Hope Farm is a great novel that captures the pleasures and difficulties of being both a parent and of being a child. The complex story of Silver and Ishtar and their fraught relationship is beautifully written, acutely observed and, best of all, completely absorbing. I could almost feel the crisp Gippsland mornings, hear the birds warbling and smell the stale dope smoke. Hope Farm is elegant, tender and very wise.’
    - Chris Womersley, award-winning author of Cairo and Bereft

     


     

     

    City of Exiles: Book Launch and Live Podcast with author Stuart Braun and the Morning Bell

    When: Wednesday 9 December

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

    Join writer and journalist Stuart Braun at the Melbourne launch of his book, "City of Exiles", a vital new insight into his adopted home, Berlin.

    What underpins the mythical allure of borderless Berlin, that city to which restless spirits, artistic outcasts and those fleeing war and persecution have long sought sanctuary?

    From Karl Marx to Franz Kafka, Christopher Isherwood, Louise Brooks, Iggy Pop, Nick Cave, Ms. Vaginal Davis and Citizen Four director Laura Poitras, "City of Exiles" asks Why Berlin?

    Stuart will be reading from the book and playing some clips from some Berlin musical exiles - – including Iggy Pop, who graces the book's cover. Signed copies are also available on the night.

    www.stuartbraun.com
     
    Stuart Braun was born in Sydney and completed a doctorate in history before living across Asia, Australia and Europe and publishing widely as a journalist and writer. He has lived in Berlin since 2009. "City of Exiles" is his first book.

    City of Exiles Synopsis

    Berlin is a no man's land, a city adrift in the sands of Central Europe. Destroyed and divided during a century of chaos and upheaval, borderless Berlin has yet remained a city where drifters, dreamers and outsiders have always believed they can find a place: Voltaire and Hannah Arendt, Iggy Pop and Albert Einstein, Franz Kafka and Rosa Luxemburg, Karl Marx and Aleister Crowley, W.H. Auden and G.W.F. Hegel, Nick Cave and Vladimir Nabokov. Australian-in-exile Stuart Braun evokes these restless spirits that have come and gone from Berlin across the last century: itinerants who, he argues, are the source of the Berliner Luft, the special free air that infuses this beguiling metropolis.  

    The Morning Bell - live podcast

     

    The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
    It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

    The next guest on Wednesday 9th December is Stuart Braun. Born in Sydney, Stuart completed a doctorate in history before living across Asia, Australia and Europe and publishing widely as a journalist and writer. Moving to Berlin in 2009, he soon started working on his ode to his adopted city, City of Exiles: Berlin from the outside in (2015), a book that explores why Berlin has long held a special allure for visionary artists, musicians and free spirits from around the world, including Iggy Pop, who graces the cover.

    You can listen to the podcasts on iTunes or Podcast Garden.

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     

    An Art Class with Tull Suwannakit

    When: Saturday 5 December

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

    BOOKINGS: email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com with your name, a contact number and the number of people you will be bringing. Free event.

    Tull will be reading his book, What Happens Next? On Saturday December 5th at noon and will be teaching children how to draw some of the characters from his books using simple geometric shapes, numbers and alphabets. 

    Learn to draw a bear, fox, hare and even an ogre too!

    And to finish off the activity, everyone will get to create their own stories  based on the catchy phrase, “What Happens Next?”

    Artist, children's book author and illustrator, Tull Suwannakit has been creating books for children since 2006.  His books have been published in Australia, UK, USA and Thailand, as well as being translated into more than 6 languages worldwide.  What Happens Next? has been short listed for 2015 Speech Pathology Australia Book of The Year Awards, and received praised reviews from ABC News, Sydney Morning Herald, and being included as part of The Australian Children’s Book Illustration Exhibition and Rights Catalogue in Bologna, Italy. His recent book, Sad, The Dog, written by Sandy Fussell is published by Walker Books, Australia and Candlewick Press, USA. When Tull is not writing and illustrating his books, he runs art classes for children and adults at his school, Malvern School of Art. 

     


     

    The Morning Bell LAUNCH PARTY

    When: Friday 27 November

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

    It's finally here. The much-anticipated launch of The Morning Bell's third issue is upon us!


    Please join The Morning Bell team on 27 November at the Brunswick St Bookstore to welcome their new book-baby into the world.


    Featuring an array of poetry, short stories, and essays, it's an insightful look into the new and emerging writers of 2015.


    Copies of the book will be sold on the night for $10 and they'll provide some drinks as well.


    Hope to see you there.

     


     

    Shelter: Kara Rosenlund in conversation with Claire Beyer

    When: Wednesday 18 November, 6.30pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

    BOOKINGS: email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com with your name, a contact number and the number of people you will be bringing. Free event.

    Kara Rosenlund travelled all over the country to seek out authentic, appealing and intriguing Australian interiors and has documented them in Shelter, with her trademark honest and poignant style.

    On her year-long journey, Kara wandered off the beaten track, across regional and remote Australia, to find the houses she wanted to document — houses whose beauty and charm told their own story. Each stunning image gives you a glimpse into their history; the abandoned cottage saved from decay by its determined new owners; the shipping container repurposed into an eco-friendly dwelling; the cliff-top hideaway overlooking the sea; or just a few of the many shacks dotted around the country, which have had new life breathed into them by their loving owners.

    The landscape is ever-present: from the rock shelf and the plains; the salt bush or the high country; down to the sand dunes or along the bridle track, the subtle influence it has on each dwelling is as powerful as the indelible mark left by its owners.

    Kara Rosenlund’s love of the ‘beautiful and tired, rambling and crumbling’, and her gift for storytelling, ensures this is a book full of character and emotion. Shelter is a celebration of the quintessentially Australian landscapes and interiors that we call home.

    kararosenlund.com

    Claire Beyer is a freelance photographer working in Melbourne and country Victoria, specialising in travel and garden photography.

    After a number of years abroad living in Europe, America and Asia, focusing on travel images, she returned to Australia to rediscover a love of black and white darkroom printing. An art form that sadly seems to be diminishing. Travelling with an old 35mm film camera in hand has produced a new way of seeing and exploring the world and the work a timeless quality.

    clairebeyerphotography.com

     


     

    Launch: Prayers of a Secular World

     

    When: Tuesday 10 November, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

     

    We're looking forward to Gilbert Rochecouste from the Village Well celebrating the advent of this little book here in Melbourne. He will be joined by one of the editors, Kevin Brophy, the person who designed the book, Sandy Cull and four poets, Maya Ward, David Francis, Carolyn Leach-Paholski and Miles Allinson.

    We'd love you to come along and celebrate this remarkable little book.

    Edited by Jordie Albiston and Kevin Brophy, with an introduction from our leading writer on Australian spirituality, David Tacey.

    A meditation on living in a post-religious world, this little book is packed with big ideas about doubt, faith and redemption for the ‘delicate formation of faults’ that runs through human nature.*

    Reading these droplets of insight about everyday life is a practice in mindfulness offering the opportunity to lift the veil and gaze at eternity. ‘A mantra that will keep us in one piece’, as the poet Kim Cheng Boey writes, this book allows us to dwell in uncomfortable ideas.

    Prayers of a Secular World is a compendium of meditations from over eighty contemporary Australian poets who have created a universally resonant language of encounter. Their blessings and epiphanies, insights and concerns, are the prayer that lives in all of us. Exquisitely finished with gold foil, this is a book of wonder and wondering, of faith and doubt, signs and epiphanies, of blessings and  longing will lift you through the darkness.

    *the phrase ‘delicate formation of faults’ is from the poem ‘Christmas Island’ by Renee Pettitt-Schipp

     

     


     

     

    'Creative Spark' events at the Thornbury Theatre


    Suburban Scrawl: The inspiration and expression of the suburbs in writing



    What is the character of Melbourne’s north and how might this be written? What voices are represented in literature and who is left out? In this discussion we will explore the allure of the suburbs and the challenges of writing place. With Sonya Hartnett, Tony Birch, Patricia Cornelius and Louise Swinn.

    Thursday 29 October, 6.30-8pm
    Thornbury Theatre, 859 High St, Thornbury

    To register your attendance, please book your free ticket here.

     


    Born to Run and other stories



    Stay tuned over the next nine weeks for reviews of books and films about running, weird literary sports facts and awkward training anecdotes! Staff member Nina is aiming to raise $500 for beyondblue as she trains for a 10k fun run. Drop your spare change in our counter-top teapot in the shop or follow the link to pledge a fiver on her fundraising page.

    https://spring-into-shape-2015.everydayhero.com/au/nina

     


     

    The F Word: Sport

     

    When: Tuesday 20 October, 6.15-7.15

    Where: at The Wheeler Centre

    ‘Can you give us a twirl and tell us about your outfit?’ – it was a lighthearted court-side request made of tennis player Roger Federer by a TV presenter at this year’s Australian Open.

    Just kidding; male athletes aren’t obliged to twirl. The request was made of world number seven Eugenie Bouchard, sparking dismay among many viewers of the Open as well as commenters on social media. Billie-Jean King, who fought against no small amount of sexism herself as a 1970s tennis champion, once said that sports are a microcosm of society. If that’s the case, does Bouchard’s experience show that things haven’t progressed as far as we might have hoped since King’s day? Or does the vocal public reaction reveal that such comments are increasingly rare?

    In the next conversation in our F Word series, we’re looking at feminism and sport. Our panellists – including world champion surfer Layne Beachley, and Olympic gold medallist swimmer Leisel Jones, whose physique was targeted by media just two days before the start of London 2012 – will discuss how media representation of women’s sport affects participation and attitudes at community level, and whether or not the importance of competitive sport as a feminist battleground can be overstated. Is there a case for ending gender segregation in sport altogether?.


    The Morning Bell - live podcast

     

    The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.
    It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

    The next guest on Wednesday 14th October is Katie Found. Katie is a Melbourne-based freelance writer and director. Her writing has featured in The Age / Sydney Morning Herald, Huffington Post, Dumbo Feather, Concrete Playground, Kill Your Darlings, Writers Bloc, and various other publications. Katie's latest short film, The Widow, starring Tony Llewellyn-Jones and Maggie Dence and produced by Katarina Mandic, was funded by Screen NSW and developed through Metro Screen's First Breaks Program in 2014. It will be hitting the festival circuit in 2015-2016.

    Website: http://www.katiefound.com/

    You can listen to the podcasts on iTunes or Podcast Garden.

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     


     

    'Creative Spark' events at the Thornbury Theatre

     

    When: Thursday 8 October and Thursday 29 October

    Where: at the Thornbury Theatre, 859 High St, Thornbury



    'Creative Spark' is a series of free events exploring, uncovering and celebrating creativity in our city.

    Creativity After Kids: how having kids impact a creative life



    What are the tensions between parenthood and a creative life? Are artists asked to make a choice between the two? How might children enrich creativity? We will explore all of these questions and more as we unpack the ways in which becoming a parent impacts on creative practice. With  Rachel Power, Tai Snaith, Lorelei Vashti and Robin Penty.

    Thursday 8 October, 6.30-8pm
    Thornbury Theatre, 859 High St, Thornbury

    To register your attendance, please book your free ticket here.

     


    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 19 August, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Sandi Sieger.

     

    Sandi is the Director & Editor-in-Chief of Onya Magazine, as well as a content producer and digital strategist for various brands. She writes for Forbes Travel Guide as their Melbourne Correspondent. In 2011, Sandi founded The Melbourne Writers’ Club. She loves seeing ink marks around her forefinger and has a terrible habit of making lists.

    Website: http://sandisieger.com/

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     


    Pip Lincolne's CRAFT FOR THE SOUL

     

    When: Wednesday 29 July, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Fitzroy Library, 128 Moor St, Fitzroy

    Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

     

     

     

    Join local author, blogger and crafter Pip Lincolne to learn practical ways to harness your creativity and bring it into your everyday life.

    Pip Lincolne is the author of 5 crafty titles (including the bestselling book Meet Me At Mike's). In her new book Craft for the Soul: How to get the most out of your creative life she shares her lifetime of wisdom on prioritizing your own creativity, finding things that spark excitement and passion, being positive, creating routines and loving your work.

    Presented in partnership with the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

    Event sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust. 

    “Craft is about building creative rituals into life, planning ahead, having faith, connections, good intentions and time spent together. A crafty life is about sharing a home that’s always a bit ‘work in progress’, with thoughts and projects flowing freely and plenty of opportunity to hatch ideas and take risks.” – Pip Lincolne

     

     


    BOOK LAUNCH: Fitzroy Community School

     

    When: Thursday 30 July, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    Faye and Philip, founders of the Fitzroy Community School, share their discoveries about working with primary-age children, and discuss what sort of influence contemporary schooling has on the people they will become.

    Read about the story of an alternative school, the invention of new school methods, discoveries about the school industry and ideas for the future of schooling.

     


    Catch and Kill: The Politics of Power - Book Launch and Panel Discussion

     

    When: Monday 3 August, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Fitzroy Library 

    Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

     

     

    To be launched by acclaimed playwright, commentator & speechwriter Michael Gurr

    Get set for a riveting night on the politics of power and the Victorian Labor Party!

    Joel Deane's Catch and Kill: The Politics of Power is a sweeping tour-de-force about political power, written from the inside. It looks at the secrets, lies and truths of four friends - Steve Bracks, John Brumby, John Thwaites, Rob Hulls - and what they did with power. How they beat the factions to get into parliament. How they won government. How they used the power of their state government to attempt to hijack Canberra’s domestic reform agenda from the Howard and Rudd governments.

    As a speechwriter and press secretary, Joel Deane had unprecedented access to the inner machinations of Australian politics and tells it how it is. He draws on over 60 interviews from past and present federal and state politicians, political staffers and unionists including Steve Bracks, John Brumby, Bob Carr, Peter Beattie, Rob Hulls, John Thwaites, Terry Moran, Geoff Gallop and the late Wayne Goss.

    Joel Deane is a poet, novelist, journalist, essayist, and speechwriter. He started out at 17 as a copyboy at the Sun News-Pictorial in Melbourne. Since then he has worked in San Francisco as a producer on the Emmy Award–winning MSNBC technology news show The Site, lectured widely on the use of public language, penned reviews and essays for Australian Book Review, and written speeches for Labor politicians such as Bill Shorten, Steve Bracks, and John Brumby. His most recent collection of poetry, Magisterium, was a finalist for the Melbourne Prize for Literature.

    ‘Joel Deane writes about politics the way it should be practised: with a cool head, a warm heart and a sense of humour.’ - George Megalogenis

    Bookings essential.  There is no need to bring a ticket with you to this event.

    Presented in partnership with University of Queensland Press and the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

    Doors open at 6.00pm for a 6.30pm start.

    Event sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.  Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), their families, an dall those working and praying for a cure.

     

     

     


    The Margaret Cutten Lecture: The Dressmaker - from Page to Screen

     

    When: Monday 3 August, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Fitzroy Library

     

    Rosalie Ham's best-selling novel The Dressmaker was an unprecedented success for a first novel. It was short listed for the Christina Stead Prize for Fiction in the NSW Premier’s Literary Awards (2001), Book of the Year Award - Booksellers Association (2001), a Finalist for State Library of Victoria's Most Popular Novel (2007) and is on the VCE list for Literature.

    The Dressmaker is an Australian gothic novel of love, hate and haute couture. Set in the 1950s, it is a bittersweet comedy about a glamorous young woman who returns, after many years in Europe, to her small home town in rural Victoria in order to right some wrongs from the past.

    Produced by Sue Maslin (Japanese Story, Road To Nhill ), with screenwriter and director Jocelyn Moorhouse, the feature film starring Kate Winslet, Judy Davis, Hugo Weaving and Liam Hemsworth will premiere on October 1st, 2015.

    This lecture (and an exhibition opening in October) acknowledge and celebrate the extraordinary contribution made to the Fitzroy Library by Margaret Cutten and The Ewing family.

    Bookings essential. 

     

    Full details and bookings

    https://www.eventbrite.com.au/e/the-margaret-cutten-lecture-the-dressmaker-from-page-to-screen-registration-17145107478

    Event sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust. 


     

    That's What Wings Are For, reading by author Patrick Guest

    When: Satruday 15 August, 2pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    Come and meet the author Patrick Guest, bring your kids, nieces, nephews and friends!

    That's What Wings Are For is a book created by Patrick Guest which has been dedicated to every boy and girl with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), their families, an dall those working and praying for a cure.

    The main character is a Dragon called Bluey, who like these boys and girls may have weak muscles, but they are strong and amazing in many other ways. It is a truly touching story with gorgeous illustrations.

     


     

    A DAY AT THE PARK, signing and Q&A with author Lucas Di Quinzio

    When: Wednesday 22 July, 7pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    Join us for an evening with Lucas Di Quinzio, author of A Day at the Park.

     

    A Day at the Park is a picture book for grown-up kids. Your local park will never seem quite the same after reading this twisted little book by Lucas Di Quinzio.

    If You liked Go the F**k to Sleep, you will love A Day at the Park, published by Overdog Press.

    Copies will be available for sale at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     

     

    JESSICA HOPPER: Living Female Rock Critic

     

    When: Monday 20 July, 6.15pm-7.15pm

    Where: at Melbourne City Conference Centre

     

     

    Jessica Hopper has been writing about music for two decades, gathering an international following for her fearless and adroit critical talents – delivered through a vast catalogue of album reviews, essays, columns, interviews and oral histories.

    She’s deconstructed Lana Del Rey for Spin, interviewed Björk and, in a longform piece for Buzzfeed, argued that selling out saved indie rock. Last year, she left her position as Rookie’s music editor to become a senior editor at Pitchfork, the Chicago-based website that’s been divining the musical zeitgeist since before it was cool. 

    Hopper’s newly published anthology, The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic, bears a title which she explains is ‘about planting a flag’ for women (and particularly young female writers) in the male-dominated world of music journalism. 

    In conversation with Myf Warhurst, Jessica will talk about the trends and trajectories of music journalism and share the backstory to her own revolutionary work.

    This event is presented in partnership with the Australian Centre for the Moving Image (ACMI).

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     

    LAUNCH!! Best-Loved Degenerate Writers to Colour and Keep an 'R-rated' colouring book by Nina Gibb

     

    When: Thursday 16 July, 7pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    In the tradition of Tee Corinne's classic colouring book (which can't be named here for reasons of propriety), comes an activity-book-collection of Best-Loved Degenerate Writers to Colour and Keep. Complete with brief and scandalous biographies, reading suggestions, a match-em quiz and detailed images to colour, cut, paste and warp as perversely as you dare, this is the gift you give (yourself!) when you want to combine the awesome adult-child powers of texta-based-mindfulness with half a bottle of red wine and your leftover cold-and-flu medication!

    Join us for the launch of Nina's Best Loved Degenerate Writers to Colour and Keep at The Brunswick Street Bookstore on Thursday the 16th of July at 7pm.


    Live Artist Event and Raffle with Elise Hurst!

    When: Sunday 12 July, from 1pm to 3pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    We have a very special event planned for mid-winter! Fine artist, author and Illustrator E.M. Hurst will be illustrating our front windows with her stunning work LIVE on Sunday the 12th of July. Come down to spend some time watching  Elise work her magic! In addition, on July 12th every purchase of Elise's gorgeous hardcover children's book Imagine a City will go into a draw to win an artist's print of an original illustration from the book!

    Elise Hurst is  a writer as well as a prolific artist and illustrator who lives and works in Melbourne. Elise has done live illustration and painting events at bookstores as well as at public and private events across Melbourne. Imagine a City is her latest children's book. 

     

     

     


    Constitutional Recognition of Indigenous Australia 

    When: Tuesday 14 July 2015, 6.15pm-7.15pm

    Where: at The Wheeler Centre BOOKED OUT

     

     

    Public opinion is now overwhelmingly in favour of the recognition of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia’s Constitution. What would be the symbolic and practical implications of such a change – and who is leading the push for a referendum?

    Join us for an exploration of the history – and potential legal, social and philosophical impacts – of constitutional change. How was our Constitution drafted, and how did Indigenous Australians come to be excluded at the birth of Australia’s federation? Why do discriminatory racial references remain in our Constitution, even after amendments to the document were carried in 1967?

    Question Time hands the discussion to you for a full hour of Q&A with our expert panellists. Unpack the laws and philosophies that have come to bear on the autonomy and acknowledgement of Indigenous Australians – from terra nullius, protectionism and forced assimilation to land rights, self-determination and potentially imminent constitutional recognition.

    Question Time is hosted by Madeleine Morris. The panel includes Patricia Turner, Jill Gallagher, Frank Brennan and George Williams.

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     


    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 8 July, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Kat Clay.

     

    Kat Clay is an award-winning photographer and writer from Melbourne, Australia. Her first novella, Double Exposure, is a weird-noir tale released June 2015 with Crime Factory. This year, she has been awarded a Melbourne UNESCO City of Literature Travel Grant to attend the World Science Fiction Convention in Spokane, Washington State. In 2012 she was a finalist in Travel Photographer of the Year, New Talent. Kat has written non-fiction articles for both travel and academic magazines, including The Victorian Writer, Literary Traveler, TNT, Travel Weekly, Matador Network and Weird Fiction Review.
     

     

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net


    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 24 June, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Earl Livings.

     

    Earl Livings has published poetry around Australia and also in Britain, Canada, the USA, and Germany. He has taught at various institutions and is the editor of Divan, Australia’s first all-Australian online poetry journal. He is currently working on a novel and his next poetry collection.
     

     

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net


    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 10 June, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Dan Machuca.

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     

     


    Plinth and Other Stories, BOOK LAUNCH

    When: Thursday 11 June, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Provincial Hotel

     

     

    Join writer and musician Malcolm Hill and his musical and literary friends for the launch of Plinth and Other Stories at the Provincial Hotel in Fitzroy. Featuring live readings from award winning Melbourne actor Caroline Lee, playwright and musician Kieran Carroll, cyrptic rock voyager Dave Graney and music from Malcolm Hill.

    Malcolm Hill is a lifetime member of the Melbourne Music Mafia and part of the ratpack of post punk Melbourne artists who have been keepin'it real across diverse art forms for thirty years. He has played music around Australia, written for theatre and television, and staged multi arts events combining his music, theatre and writing.

    "Evocative, whip crack sharp and often hilarious storytelling. "

    More information on www.malcolmhill.com.au

     

     


     

      The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 10 June, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Cassandra L.

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     


     

     THE TRUTH ABOUT FRENCH WOMEN - Book presentation, Q&A and book signing with the author: Marie-Morgane Le Moël

     

    When: Wednesday 27th May 2015, 6.30pm


    Where: at the Alliance Française, 51 Grey Street, ST KILDA.





    The Alliance Française is delighted to present Marie-Morgane Le Moël’s new book, “The truth about French women”, followed by a Q&A and book signing.

    So you think you know about French women?

    One might ask: why write another book about French women, after so many books have already been written? Why add another volume to the pile of French women stuff already flooding the bookshops; why take the risk of writing something that might end up in a dark shop corner, covered in dust? For one reason: French women are worth more than mere clichés. They have done so much more than simply be elegant.

    The history of France wasn’t only made by Louis XIV, Napoleon and all those grands hommes buried at the Pantheon in Paris. Examples abound of women who fought for freedom, for liberties, because they believed in greater causes, causes that have been, throughout the ages, reserved for men. Reducing them to chic, elegant and sexual beings doesn’t reflect reality.

    The French environment, its culture and rich history, have produced a certain type of man and woman. It has produced, too, a certain type of relationship between the two genders, where seduction and games play an important part. And in order to better fight the sterotypes, one has to try to put their finger on what constitutes a modern French woman, why she has become an example often quoted and whether she deserves it.

    About the author

    Marie-Morgane Le Moël studied literature, English, political sciences and journalism at university. From from 2007 till 2012, Marie was the correspondent for Le Monde and RFI, while living in Australia and was in charge of covering the news across Oceania. She also worked on the French radio program at SBS.

    At the end of 2012 Marie moved back to Paris, where she works as a journalist for AFP. Marie’s books in­clude Le goût de l’Australie for le Mercure de France, Dictionnaire insolite de l’Australie, for Cosmopole and Secrets of a Lazy French Cook for HarperCollins.



    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

    Local Governance in Timor-Leste: Q&A and book signing with the author, Deborah Cummins

     

    When: Friday 15 May, 6.30pm

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    We are delighted to present Deborah Cummins’ new book, Local Governance in Timor-Leste: Lessons in Postcolonial Statebuilding

     

    Deborah Cummins is returning for a visit to Melbourne to share some experiences, thoughts and musings from her new book about local governance in the villages of Timor-Leste (known to many as East Timor, which gained its independence from Indonesia in 1999). This is a book about local life, law and governance in the villages of Timor-Leste. It is also a book about what happens when very Westernised systems of governance are imposed on villagers, without taking into account their culture and local realities.

     

    As with many other postcolonial nations around the world, Timorese communities are characterised by two systems of law and governance: the law and governance of the state, and customary law and governance which has served Timorese villages for centuries. Customary governance, known as lisan or adat, continues to be strong, particularly in the rural areas, even as democratisation takes hold. This is everyday reality for Timorese villagers, who cross daily between these two systems, but is something that the United Nations and other international organisations have found difficult to understand. As a result, much of the statebuilding process has failed to engage with villagers’ lived experiences, leaving many people disengaged and disenfranchised as their state has been built around them.

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     

    Handcrafted Timorese door prizes will be given out. Drink on arrival.

    About the author:

    Deborah Cummins is a researcher and academic, and the founder of community development organisation ‘Bridging Peoples’, which focuses on promoting community-sensitive approaches to development. She lives and works in Timor-Leste.

     


     

     Skin - Ilka Tamke in conversation with Nigel Burgess

    When: Thursday 14 May,6.30pm - RSVP by email: events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

    Where: at the Provincial, 299 Brunswick Street


    Skin is the thrilling and captivating story about a young woman’s rise to power in Iron-Age Britain on the eve of the Roman invasion. This is a rousing novel about the collision of two societies, the making of a female leader, and the choices—both romantic and political—Ailia has to make

    amidst the storm-cloud of the Roman advance.

     

    Ilka Tampke has undertaken incredible research and as a result, Skin is historically accurate in its depictions of the arrival of the modern world, and of what happens when an imperial culture imposes its power and crushes an ancient belief system.

     

    Featuring a feisty heroine, Ailia, who was abandoned at birth and doesn’t know her ‘skin’, this riveting and sensuous debut novel by an exciting new author will delight readers young and old. 

     

     

    Deeply layered, densely, sensuously written and profoundly original’ Isobelle Carmody

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore


     The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 13 May, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with Helen Milte, host of Literary Punk podcast.

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     


    Hot Little Hands - Abigail Ulman in conversation with Michaela McGuire

    When: Thursday 7 May,6.30pm - RSVP by email: events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

    Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

    A fresh new voice in Australian fiction, Abigail Ulman brings us Hot Little Hands, a brilliantly crafted collection of short stories about growing up, coming of age, and learning what it means to desire, and be desired. In nine funny, relatable and, at times, confronting stories, we meet a group of girls and women in their teens and twenties, each on the cusp of adulthood, with varying degrees of readiness and willingness to accept what lies ahead. In their own ways, they must discover what it means to venture out beyond the brink. Same Old Same As tells the story of Ramona, with her chocolate-box suburban life and too-perfect boyfriend, who desperately wants to stand out. Then there’s Elise and Jenni in Head to Toe, too old for horse camp, too bored of partying, but not yet grown enough to leave it all behind. And then Amelia in Plus One, so paralysed by the prospect of starting her career that she decides to have a baby with her gay best friend instead. With her vivid and unique prose, Abigail Ulman perfectly depicts and dissects the Gen Y zeitgeist. She captures those all-too-familiar moments of self-discovery, embarrassment, disappointment and joy that colour our adolescent years, and expresses an ineluctable truth: no matter the experience you gain, being an adult never quite feels the way it looked from far away.

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

     

    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    When: Wednesday 29 April, 7pm

    Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Joel Martin and Luke Manly in conversation with special guest to be confirmed.

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net

     


      

    We’re All Going To Die (Especially Me):

    Joel Meares in conversation with Lorelei Vashti

     

    When: Tuesday 21st April, 6.30pm - RSVP by email: events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

    Where: at The Provincial Hotel, 299 Brunswick Street

     

    Join us for an evening with Joel Meares, author of We’re All Going to Die (Especially Me) in conversation with Lorelei Vashti.

    ‘My late twenties have felt like a series of slow-motion epiphanies, each one sneaking up before slapping me in my newly acquired jowls. Everything I said I’d do ‘by the time I’m thirty’ as a glassy-eyed graduate is now in the ‘by the time I’m forty’ box.’

    Much has been made of delayed adulthood of Gen Y’ers—that they flit from job to job and take their sweet time earning the traditional adult badges: marriage, children, a mortgage. But what makes this generation tick?

    In We’re All Going to Die (Especially Me), award-winning journalist Joel Meares reflects on the muddle of Gen Y existence with razor-sharp insight and riotous good humour. From ‘My hands are pretty, and little’ and ‘I can’t handle my drugs’ to ‘I am not a New Yorker’ and ‘I make an excellent bridesmaid’, Meares’ essays are self-deprecating, confessional and rollicking good fun.

    ‘We’re All Going To Die is like a series of late-night conversations with someone so smart, perceptive and wry, you’re already secretly planning to make them be your new best friend.’—Benjamin Law

    ‘Joel Meares is going to die at some point. He’s not planning on taking any secrets with him though, it appears. Hilarious!’—Annabel Crabb

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

     An Evening with Kate Grenville

    When: Thursday 16 April 2015, 7pm

    Where: at Fitzroy Town Hall, Reading Room, 201 Napier Street, Fitzroy

     

    Yarra Libraries presents an evening with Kate Grenville.

    One of Australia’s best-loved and admired authors, Kate Grenville has published eight novels. Her international bestseller The Secret River, received the Commonwealth Prize for Literature and the Christina Stead Prize, and was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the Miles Franklin Literary Award. The Idea of Perfection won the Orange Prize. Grenville’s other novels include Sarah Thornhill, The Lieutenant, Lilian’s Story, Dark Places and Joan Makes History.

    When Kate’s mother died she left behind many fragments of memoir, leading to her latest book. One Life: My Mother’s Story is a daughter’s intimate and loving account of her mother’s life.

    Presented in partnership with Text Publishing and Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore


     

    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    Wednesday 15th April 2015, 7pm

    at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

    Featuring self-publishing guru Euan Mithcell and some loser called Lucas Di Quinzio.

     

    Oh, and just in case you forgot, The Morning Bell issue #2 is out now and it's half price. Go up to that shop page and buy it. We'll be your best friend.

     

    http://www.themorningbell.net/shop/

     

     

     

    Hope to see you there, everyone.

     


    Still a Pygmy BOOK LAUNCH

    When: Friday 10th April 2015, 6.pm-6.30pm

    Where: at The Provincial Hotel, Brunswick Street, Fitzroy

     

    We invite you to the Melbourne launch of ‘Still a Pygmy’ by Isaac Bacirongo and Michael Nest, a memoir which tells the story of how Isaac grew up as a Pygmy hunter-gatherer in the forest of Congo and now finds himself in Sydney, Australia.

    You can find out more about this compelling memoir at www.finch.com.au/still-a-pygmy.

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

    Quarterly Essay: On Healthcare and Ageing: Karen Hitchcock

    When: Thursday 9th April 2015, 6.15pm-7.15pm

    Where: at The Wheeler Centre

     

    In a timely Quarterly Essay, doctor and writer Karen Hitchcock investigates the treatment of the elderly and dying through some unforgettable cases. With honesty and deep experience, she looks at end-of-life decisions, frailty and dementia, over-treatment and attitudes to ageing and death among doctors, patients and their families.

    Hitchcock reveals a creeping ageism, often disguised, which threatens to turn the elderly into a ‘burden’ – difficult, hopeless, expensive and homogenous. While we rightly seek to curb treatment when it is futile, harmful or against a patient's wishes, this can sometimes lead to limits on care that suit the system rather than the person. Doctors may declare a situation hopeless when it may not be so.

    Hitchcock believes we need to plan for a new future when more of us will be old, with an aim of making that time better, not shorter. And that we must change our institutions to fit the needs of an ageing population.

    Karen is a sometimes provocative, always original and deeply informed thinker, as demonstrated in her regular essays on medical issues for The Monthly. In conversation with Ranjana Srivastava, Karen will share her views on and experiences of ageing and the medical system, from an insider’s point of view.

     

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore


     

    The Morning Bell - live podcast

    Wednesday 1st April 2015, 7pm

    at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

    To coincide with the launch of ‘The Morning Bell Issue 2’ is live recording of The Morning Bell podcast with acclaimed fantasy author Michael Pryor at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

    Issue #2 will be available to download on April 1st. and if you come to the launch/recording, you can have it for free.

    Hope to see you there, everyone.

     


     Airmail: Taking Women of Letters to the Word - BOOK LAUNCH

     

    Tuesday 29 March 2015, 1.30 pm

    at The Regal Ballroom, 216 High St, Northcote

     

    Women of Letters are bewaring the Ides of March as they tend to do every year as they are a cautious bunch and if you can think of a finer way to do it than gathering at the Regal Ballroom to celebrate all things post-related well look we'll have to respectfully agree to disagree.

     

    On Sunday 29th March, the Women of Letters team will present together for the first time ever on stage:

    Acclaimed feature film director and documentary maker GILLIAN ARMSTRONG

    Award-winning cabaret superstar SARAH WARD

    Beloved singer-songwriter MONIQUE BRUMBY

    Prolific author and illustrator SALLY RIPPIN

    Acclaimed author of ‘What Came Before’ ANNA GEORGE

     

    These wondrous women will each be penning 'A letter to my happy accident.' There'll be the usual wine and letter-writing combo we’ve grown to love, and a special DJ set by the dapper DJ BABY BONUS (BRODIE LANCASTER). Join us for a most pleasant afternoon celebrating a diverse range of strong female talent whilst simultaneously raising funds for animal rescue shelter, Edgar's Mission (http://www.edgarsmission.org.au/). Bookings essential, this show will sell out! ACCESS REQUIREMENTS: If you have any access requirements, please contact mariekeandmichaela@gmail.com directly so that they can arrange priority seating.

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     

     

     


     

    Hannie Rayson in Fitzroy

     

    When:

    Tuesday, 24th March 2015 7:00pm

     

    Where:

    Fitzroy Town Hall, 201 Napier Street, Fitzroy VICright

     

    Price:

    Free, bookings essential

     

    Yarra Libraries presents an evening with Hannie Rayson.

    One of Australia’s most significant playwrights and screenwriters, Hannie Rayson’s works - including Hotel Sorrento, Inheritance and Life After George - have been performed around Australia and internationally.

    Hannie has received two Australian Writers’ Guild Awards, four Helpmann Awards, two NSW Premier’s Literary Awards and a Victorian Premier’s Literary Award. She is the only playwright ever to be nominated for the Miles Franklin Award.

    Her new book Hello, Beautiful!: Scenes from a Life captures her life behind the scenes - a life of tender moments, hilarious encounters and, inevitably, drama.


    Presented in partnership with Text Publishing and Brunswick Street Bookstore.


     

     

    Tuesday 10 March 2015, 6.15pm-7.15pm

    at The Wheeler Centre

    Writing on Mothers

    Mothers are among the ultimate female archetypes: after all, a mother’s body is where life begins. And even in this (relatively) enlightened age, mothers are the ones, more often than not, responsible for nurturing their children and ushering them safely to adulthood. No wonder that when things go wrong, the mother is often the first place we look for blame. Conversely, mothers of successful children are exalted as saints – and mothers of difficult children are martyrs … when they manage not to crack under the pressure. No matter which way you look at it, there’s a lot to live up to.

    In honour of International Women’s Day, our host Monica Dux, along with Patti Miller and Ceridwen Dovey, we’ll explore the fertile territory of motherhood, and celebrate mothers on the page. We’ll look at the intricacies and the ecstasies of writing on mothers: writing our mothers, writing as a mother, and some of the worst and best mothers represented in fiction. (From The Great Gatsby’s Daisy Buchanan and Oranges Are Not The Only Fruit’s Mrs Winterson, to Harry Potter’s Molly Weasley and I Capture the Castle’s Topaz).

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore


     

    Thursday 5 March 2015, 7.30pm-8.30pm

    at Melbourne City Conference Centre BOOKED OUT

     The Wheeler Centre presents:

    Roxane Gay

     

    Roxane Gay’s essay ‘Bad Feminist’ was described by theGuardian as ‘the most persuasive feminist recruitment drive in recent memory’: she argues for embracing the values of feminism, while admitting her own contradictions and imperfections as a feminist.

     

    Her book of the same name – a vibrant, provocative, thoughtful collection of essays that blend pop culture, memoir, and politics – is similarly complex and nuanced. Gay, a creative writing professor, brilliantly blends high and low culture in her work: her essay on The Hunger Games is also a reflection on female strength and surviving trauma, and she eviscerates mainstream American culture’s lingering racism through critiques of films like The Help and Django Unchained. She draws on the personal throughout, but always with a purpose. ‘I’ll show you my bloody guts, but there’s going to be, hopefully, a larger purpose to the writing,’ she says.

     

    The Haitian-American writer has also been a driving force in agitating to raise the profile of writers of colour, conducting a count of the books reviewed by leading publications. And her debut novel, Untamed State, about a brutal kidnapping in Haiti and its gruelling aftermath, has been hailed as ‘riveting … smart, searing’ by the Washington Post.

     

    Meet one of America’s most engaging new literary voices.

    http://www.wheelercentre.com/events/roxane-gay

    Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

     

    Elizabeth Martin - Tea House in the Lime Trees

     

    Book Launch

    Friday 6th March , 6.30 - 8pm

    Come and join us for the Melbourne launch of Elizabeth Martin's second novel: 'Tea House in the Lime Trees'!

    Friday 6th March 6.30pm at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

     


     

    Graeme Simsion - The Rosie Effect

    Author Talk and Book Signing

    Tuesday 9 December, 6.45 - 9pm

    Fitzroy Town Hall, Napier Street, Fitzroy

    We are delighted to welcome Graeme Simsion back to Fitzroy to celebrate the launch of The Rosie Effect, the spellbinding sequel to his hilarious romantic comedy, The Rosie Project.

     

    A phenomenal success, The Rosie Project has been on international bestseller lists and the film rights have been optioned by Sony Pictures. It won the 2014 ABIA for Best General Fiction Book, and was ultimately awarded Australian Book of the Year for 2014.

     

    Hear about the evolution of his work and what happens next in his wonderfully endearing and moving sequel. Don Tillman and Rosie Jarman are now married and living in New York when Rosie drops a bombshell: she’s pregnant. In true Tillman style, Don instantly becomes an expert on all things obstetric. And while he strives to get the technicalities right, he gets the emotions all wrong, and risks losing Rosie when she needs him most.

     

    Doors open at 6.45pm. Talk at 7pm followed by book signing until 9pm.

    Presented in partnership with The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

     

    PLEASE NOTE: Bookings are essential and tickets must be printed and brought to the event.

    If you are unable to print your tickets, you may print them free of charge at your local Yarra Libraries branch.

     

    Click here to book