News & Events

Upcoming Event

Sami Shah: Fire Boy – Talk, reading and signing session

When: Thursday 3 November, 6.30pm

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

 

Come and listen to Sami talk about his inspirations for the book, read a creepy excerpt, and sign copies!

A boy who is half-human, half-djinn, growing up in one of the most violent cities in the world. That’s the story that NSW Premier’s Award nominated writer Sami Shah tells us in FIRE BOY. It’s a book with Islamic mythology, urban horror, and real-world corruption, that Maxine Beneba Clarke called, “An imagination explosion”.

Good Morning America: The Election As It Happens

When: Wednesday 9 November, 7.30am

 

Where: at Deakin Edge, Federation Square (The Wheeler Centre). Click here to book

 

‘America does seem, at times, to forget that it’s on camera and the entire world can see when it strips naked and rants at itself in the mirror.’ So wrote Laurie Penny of the US presidential race back in February. Since then, well, that guy from The Apprentice won the Republican nomination and Hillary Clinton was embroiled in a cloning conspiracy.

 

But the bizarre pageantry will come to an official end on 8 November as Americans vote for their 45th president. With such extraordinary candidates, the outcome will be explosive no matter who wins. You’re going to need to commune with your fellow nerds as the results roll in and – don’t worry – we’ve got you covered.

 

At Deakin Edge on the morning of 9 November (time zones, remember!), the Wheeler Centre will bring you up-to-the-minute coverage.

 

Our panel of experts will recap the highs and lows of this truly weird, ‘post-truth’ presidential race. We’ll cross to correspondents on the ground to decode the exit polls. We’ll even reminisce about the Obama presidency: the hope that preceded it, and the legacy the first African-American president leaves behind.

 

Come and kick some balloons, Bill Clinton-style, as we count down to the (possible) apocalypse.

 

The Morning Bell – live podcast with Briohny Doyle

When: Wednesday 9 November, 7pm

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 9 November is Briohny Doyle. Briohny is a Melbourne-based writer and academic. Her debut novel, The Island Will Sink, is the first book published by The Lifted Brow.

 

Briohny’s work has appeared in publications like The Lifted Brow, The Age, Overland, Going Down Swingingand Meanjin, among others, and she has performed her work at the Sydney Festival and at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney.

 

Her first book of non-fiction, Adult Fantasy (Scribe Publications, 2017), will explore the cultural underpinnings of adulthood.

http://www.briohny-doyle.com/the-island-will-sink

Book launch: Glasshouses by Stuart Barnes

When: Wednesday 16 November, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

Join us for the launch of Glasshouses by Stuart Barnes.

Stuart Barnes is one of Australia’s most talented poets and a rising star. He won the prestigious Arts Queensland Thomas Shapcott Prize for Poetry last year with this finely crafted collection as an unpublished manuscript.

 

Glasshouses’ poems illuminate city and coastal life. They sweep across Stuart’s mental landscapes and allude to a deep engagement with both classical and contemporary culture, seeming to orchestrate an eclectic and original music.

 

trumpeting

through blood &

bone the glasshouse’s

yellow stars

 

Being full of extraordinary imagery and inventive twists and turns, the poems curate a wondrous treasury of the new and imagined. With wisdom and intelligence, however, Stuart maintains a balance between attention and adventure in order to give the collection coherence and accessibility. Each poem can be read at many levels.

 

Stuart is following in the distinguished tradition of the Queensland poets who have won the Thomas Shapcott prize before him, among them David Stavanger, Sarah Holland-Batt, Felicity Plunkett and Krissy Kneen.

 

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Every second Wednesday

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

http://themorningbell.com.au

 

PAST EVENTS

The Morning Bell – live podcast with Steven Amsterdam

When: Wednesday 19 October, 7pm

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 26 October is Steven Amsterdam. Steven was born in New York City and has worked as a map editor, producer’s assistant, and a pastry chef. Since 2003, he has lived in Melbourne, where he is a writer and palliative care nurse. His fiction and non-fiction has appeared in The Age, Conde Nast Traveller, Meanjin, The Monthly, Salon, Sleepers Almanac, and The Virginia Quarterly Review, as well as other journals and anthologies.

 

His debut novel, Things We Didn’t See Coming, won The Age Book of the Year in Australia and was longlisted for The Guardian First Book Award. His second book, What the Family Needed, was longlisted for the International IMPAC Prize and shortlisted for the Encore Award. His new novel is The Easy Way Out.

 

Steven has been a fellow at Varuna-The Writers House, a resident at Rosebank and the Booranga Writers Centre, and a recipient of a grant from the Australia Council. He has run workshops or seminars from Capetown to Edinburgh. And, thanks to the Italian publisher of What the Family Needed, he once appeared in Uomo Vogue.

 

Website: http://www.stevenamsterdam.com

A Matter of Trust: Writing Sexual Abuse

When: Monday 17 October, 6.15pm

 

Where: at The Wheeler Centre. Free event, bookings essential

 

 

In 2013, Joanne McCarthy from the Newcastle Herald received a Gold Walkley Award for her reporting on the sexual abuse cover-up in the Hunter Valley Region. Accepting the award, she thanked the survivors, who had placed their trust in her as a journalist, and in their local paper. ‘People who have every reason in the world not to trust – they trusted us,’ she said.

 

When it comes to writing and reporting, there aren’t many subjects as sensitive or painful as that of sexual abuse. In this discussion, we’ll hear from two writers who have broached this topic in their work: McCarthy, whose investigations led to the royal commission into institutional child sexual abuse and Manny Waks, author of Who Gave You Permission?, a memoir of the abuse he suffered at the ultra-orthodox Yeshivah Centre Melbourne. Waks has worked as a victim advocate and his research culminated in a public hearing into Australian Jewish institutions at the royal commission.

 

Hosted by Trauma-scapes author Maria Tumarkin, the pair will discuss the processes and ramifications of this difficult but essential work: interviewing survivors and perpetrators, the challenges of trust and verification and the frustrations of institutional cover-up.

 

This discussion includes topics that some attendees may find confronting. Audience questions from this event will not be recorded and published.

Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

Sports Writers Festival: explores politics, integrity, equality and more…

The Brunswick Street Bookstore is the official bookseller for the Sports Writers Festival.

When: October 14 -19th

Where: Various locations – check website for details

 

 

Now in its second year, the Sports Writers Festival celebrates sport through the written word.

Sport expresses the human condition, it’s about ethics, money, power, politics, identity and culture. The festival brings together esteemed journalists, writers and readers who share a passion for sport and great writing and is a highly anticipated feature of the Melbourne literary and sporting calendar. Held in sport and art mad Melbourne, with a special event in Sydney the annual Sports Writers Festival, runs from 14–19 October.

 

The Sports Writers Festival will open with Martin Flanagan, esteemed journalist for The Age and Fairfax Media, exploring the issue of sport and politics. The closing event will feature David Walsh, Sunday Times journalist and author of the best selling ‘Seven Deadly Sins’, sharing the journey of his pursuit of the truth about Lance Armstrong, and the aftermath of his exposé of the now-disgraced cyclist.

 

Festival creator and curator Francis Leach (pictured above) will host the conversation with multi-award winner Walsh, and pays credit to the bigger picture of what he’s achieved.

 

‘With his work exposing Lance Armstrong, David Walsh helped rescue cycling and won a fantastic victory for integrity in sport,’ said Leach.

 

Leach and Walsh will share their conversation with audiences in both Melbourne and Sydney, giving Sydneysiders their first taste of what the Sports Writers Festival has to offer.

 

Flanagan’s opening night address will be another first – the inaugural Festival oration – and Leach is adamant that there is no one better suited for the honour.

 

‘Martin Flanagan taps into the soul of Australian sport like no one else. He helps us understand who we are by the way we play the games we love,’ said Leach. ‘This is bound to be compelling.’

 

Complementing these two events, a host of Australian and international guests will provide insight into topics including the rise of women’s sport, Australian sports writers as celebrities, the art of long form sports writing, and the US sports writing scene. The program provides a notable expansion on last November’s first outing for the Festival, which consisted of a single day of events.

 

‘We’re thrilled to be bringing together such a diverse, challenging and exciting program of events,’ said Leach.

Most events will take place at the Melbourne Town Hall, in the heart of the city. For full program details of the 2016 Sports Writers Festival, and to book tickets, visit www.sportswritersfestival.com.au.

The Morning Bell – live podcast with Brooke Maggs

When: Wednesday 12 October, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin, Luke Manly and Ian Laking, who are up and coming Melbourne writers, and arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 12 October is Brooke Maggs. Brooke is an independent writer, narrative designer and producer based in Melbourne, Australia.

 

She is working with The Voxel Agents as a writer, narrative designer and producer for The Gardens Between, a gorgeous adventure puzzle game with no text or speech and keeps a development blog for this project on tumblr. She is also the narrative designer on Earthlight, a virtual reality game about the wonders and perils of space, which is being developed by Opaque Multimedia.

 

Recently named in the top 100 most influential women in games, Brooke has talked about games and writing fiction on a range of panels at festivals and industry conventions. She has over eight years of experience teaching user experience design, communications, game studies, project management and cultural studies at university level.

 

She recently wrote an explanatory piece on game writing for The Conversation and ArtsHub and continues to write about her experiences in this field. Brooke writes research papers on the importance of games and play in creative writing and the links between digital literature and traditional literature.

 

Her short stories have been published in the crime anthology, The One That Got Away,  and have been highly commended for the Scarlet Stiletto Award. She was awarded a Residential Fellowship at the Varuna House for the development of her speculative fiction novel.

 

She enjoys surfing, running and questing for the best smashed avocado in Melbourne.

 

 

website: http://www.brookemaggs.com/

A CONVERSATION WITH TIM WINTON

When: Friday 7 October at 6:30pm

 

Where: at Fitzroy Town Hall, 201 Napier St, Fitzroy

 

Presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust, Yarra Libraries & The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

Tickets: Free – Bookings Essential: clike here to book BOOKED OUT SORRY

Wilder Beasts: The Global Scary and Supernatural

When: Tuesday 13 September

 

Where: at The Wheeler Centre. SORRY BOOKED OUT

 

We’ve seen so many werewolves in the last decade that they’re starting to look a little, well, house-trained.

 

With the recent explosion in popularity of genre fiction, many of the loathsome figures of western mythology and pop culture are losing their scare-factor. Are vampires and zombies still lurking in the shadows of your imagination? Please. You can do so much worse.

 

Enter Sami Shah, whose fantasy/horror novel, Fire Boy, is set in Karachi, Pakistan, and is riddled with soul-stealing djinns (shape-shifting demon/genies made of smokeless fire) and various other nightmarish creatures from Muslim mythology. Tired of the mainstay preternatural creatures of the western imagination, Sami has chosen to write of the mythical demons that haunted his own childhood. ‘My monsters are not yours,’ he says.

 

Join Sami and the panel for a broader, spookier discussion of genre fiction from across the world. What creepy spirits lurk under Malaysian, Moroccan and Mexican beds? Do demons and monsters share similar qualities across the world? Or do their powers reflect something of the culture of their origin?

 

Books on sale by The Brunswick Street Bookstore.

Zoe Morrison in conversation with Anne Manne

When: Wednesday 14 September, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, click here to book.

This event is sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.

 

 

Framed as a memoir, Music and Freedom is a cleverly crafted literary debut and the sheer brilliance of Morrison’s prose is a delight to read. By turns heart-breaking and hilarious, this is a beautiful meditation on morality, love, faith, happiness and the transformative power of music and love to set us free.

 

Join Zoe, in conversation with journalist and social philosopher, Anne Manne, in exploring the novel’s themes and issues.

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 14 September, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guests on Wednesday 14 September are Katie Found & Sarah Vickery:http://www.catherineandkatherine.com/team/

Disability in Australia: Graeme Innes in conversation with Sally Warhaft

When: Tuesday 20 September, 6.15pm

 

Where: at the Wheeler Centre. Free event, bookings essential. Click here to book.

 

‘I have never accepted the concept of “lifters” and “leaners”’, Graeme Innes has said. ‘We all move from one role to the other dozens of times a day.’

 

Innes made this remark during a blistering National Press Club speech in 2014, as the outgoing federal disability discrimination commissioner. The notion of ‘lifters’ and ‘leaners’ entered the Australian political lexicon via former Treasurer Joe Hockey, but it’s an old concept, and one that Innes has fought against for much of his life.

 

Born blind, Innes was determined from an early age to pursue a fulfilling and demanding career. His new book, Finding a Way, describes his early life as well as the highs and lows of that career – as a lawyer, mediator, company director and commissioner at the Australian Human Rights Commission, working on issues relating to race, disability and same-sex discrimination.

 

In conversation with Sally Warhaft, Innes will reflect on his personal and professional achievements and discuss the state of disability policy in Australia today. What’s the future of the National Disability Insurance Scheme? And is our society getting better at understanding the potential, as well as the needs, of people with disabilities?

BOOK LAUNCH: Digital Photography and Everyday Life

When: Thursday 8 September, 6pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please click here to RSVP

Please join us for the launch of  Digital Photography and Everyday Life, co-edited by DERC’s Edgar Gómez Cruz and Asko Lehmuskallio. Dr Daniel Palmer (Monash University) will open the launch at the Brunswick Street Bookstore.

 

Digital Photography and Everyday Life: Empirical studies on material visual practices explores the role that digital photography plays within everyday life.

 

With contributors from ten different countries and backgrounds in a range of academic disciplines – including anthropology, media studies and visual culture – this collection takes a uniquely broad perspective on photography by situating the image-making process in wider discussions on the materiality and visuality of photographic practices, and exploring these through empirical case studies.

 

By focusing on material visual practices, the book presents a comprehensive overview of some of the main challenges digital photography is bringing to everyday life. It explores how the digitization of photography has wide-reaching impact on the use of the medium, as well as on the kinds of images that can be produced and the ways in which camera technology is developed. The exploration goes beyond mere images to think about cameras, mediations and technologies as key elements in the development of visual digital cultures.

 

Edgar Gómez Cruz is a Vice-Chancellor Research Fellow at RMIT, Melbourne. He has published widely on a number of topics relating to digital culture, ethnography, and photography. His recent publications include the book From Kodak Culture to Networked Image: An Ethnography of Digital Photography Practices (2012). Current research investigates screen cultures and creative practices, which is funded through RCUK and Vice Chancellor research grants.

 

Asko Lehmuskallio is Chair of the ECREA TWG Visual Culture and founding member of the Nordic Network for Digital Visuality. As researcher at the Universities of Tampere and Siegen, he specialises in visual culture, mediated human action and networked cameras. Recent books include Pictorial Practices in a “Cam Era”: Studying non-professional camera use(2012) and #snapshot: Cameras amongst us (co-ed, 2014).

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 31 August, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 17 August is Laura Elizabeth Woollett. Laura was born and raised in Perth, Western Australia. She moved to Melbourne after high school and, in 2012, completed an honours degree in creative writing at the University of Melbourne. Her first novel, The Wood of Suicides, was written while she was an undergraduate, and concerns a teacher-student relationship. It was published in the US in early 2014. The same year, she was awarded a Wheeler Centre/Readings Foundation Hot Desk Fellowship and the John Marsden/Hachette Prize for Fiction. In 2015, she was chosen as one of Melbourne Writers Festival’s ‘30 Under 30’. She is currently at work on her second novel, Beautiful Revolutionary, about a young counterculture couple who become involved with Jim Jones’ Peoples Temple in late ’60s California.

 

Website: https://lauraelizabethwoollett.com/

Better Reading: interview with Liam Pieper

When: Friday 19 August, 11.30am

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

Better Reading‘s next weekend read is Liam Pieper’s The Toymaker. Come and listen Liam being interviewed live at the Brunswick Street Bookstore, and pick up a signed copy of The Toymaker if you don’t already have one!

From its opening pages The Toymaker chips away at the story of a family’s survival, each masterful stroke undercutting preconceptions to reveal layers of secrets and misdeeds that, slice by slice, peel back to humanity’s greatest crime: the Holocaust.

 

Adam Kulakov is the destructive, self-involved scion of a successful toy company, Sarah & Mitty – founded by his grandfather Arkady and now almost single-handedly run by Adam’s capable and stoic wife, Tess. Adam tries, and constantly fails, to be more like his urbane Russian grandfather – a witty, bright and resourceful man who weathered the horrors of Auschwitz, married a young Jewish survivor and built a thriving business based on the original dolls, which had been carved to lighten the lives of children in the very darkest of places.

 

Now his grandson’s risk-taking behaviour – including an affair with an underage schoolgirl – seem poised to tear down everything Arkady has built. But as Tess uncovers a trail of embezzled company funds, and Arkady’s failing health exposes him to the terrors of his past, it seems there may be even darker things to contend with.

 

Liam Pieper deftly guides readers beyond the carefully constructed narrative of the Kulakov family, through an increasingly disturbing labyrinth of lies, betrayal and the very basest of human impulses. And his scrutiny is far ranging – straying from the grubby peccadillos of a privileged man-child to the dubious ethics of cheap outsourced labour and the impossible dilemma of those forced into the death camps’ notorious Sonderkommando units.

 

Pieper pulls apart each character until they reveal the stuff of which they are really made. And, in the end, nothing is as it seems. The Toymaker is a clever, haunting read, each well-crafted line drawing the reader inexorably to its final, chilling conclusion.

 

Liam Pieper is Melbourne-based writer and journalist. His darkly witty memoir, The Feel-Good Hit of the Year, was shortlisted for the National Biography Award and the Ned Kelly Best True Crime award. He has also penned a collection of humorous essays, Mistakes Were Made, published as a Penguin Special. He was co-recipient of the 2014 M Literary Award, winner of the 2015 Geoff Dean Short Story Prize and the inaugural creative resident of the UNESCO City of Literature of Prague. The Toymaker is his first novel.

NEW WORKS ON PAPER – poets and makers in conversation with Antonia Pont

When: Saturday 13 August, 4.15pm for 4.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore, upstairs.

3 pairs of artists were set the task of working alongside each other on solo projects.

They’ve had 5 weeks, and will read and share their creations, as well as discuss the process – its boons and misses – this coming Saturday 13 August, at 4.30pm. Free entry.

 

Lisa Gorton | Skye Baker | Kent MacCarter | Leah Muddle | Campbell Thomson | Rosalind McFarlane

 

Come along and hear from experienced poets and artists, making new things, in new ways, in new company.

 

Supported by Deakin University – School of Communication and Creative Arts, and Meniscus Journal.

BOOK LAUNCH: Screen Ecologies

When: Thursday 4 August, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please click here to RSVP

Please join us at the Brunswick Street Bookstore to celebrate the launch of our new publication, Screen Ecologies, by Larissa Hjorth, Sarah Pink, Kristen Sharp and Linda Williams. The evening will be opened by RMIT Pro Vice-Chancellor and Vice President, Professor Paul Gough.

 

Images of environmental disaster and degradation have become part of our everyday media diet. This visual culture focusing on environmental deterioration represents a wider recognition of the political, economic, and cultural forces that are responsible for our ongoing environmental crisis. And yet efforts to raise awareness about environmental issues through digital and visual media are riddled with irony, because the resource extraction, manufacturing, transportation, and waste associated with digital devices contribute to environmental damage and climate change.

Screen Ecologies examines the relationship of media, art, and climate change in the Asia-Pacific region—a key site of both environmental degradation and the production and consumption of climate-aware screen art and media.

 

Screen Ecologies shows how new media and visual artists provide alternative ways for understanding the entanglements of media and the environment in the Asia-Pacific. It investigates such topics as artists’ exploration of alternative ways to represent the environment; regional stories of media innovation and climate change; the tensions between amateur and professional art; the emergence of biennials, triennials, and new arts organizations; the theme of water in regional art; new models for networked collaboration; and social media’s move from private to public realms. A generous selection of illustrations shows a range of artist’s projects.

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 3 August, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 3 August is Toni Jordan. Toni is the author of four novels. The international best-seller Addition (2008), was a Richard and Judy Bookclub pick and was longlisted for the Miles Franklin award. Fall Girl (2010) was published internationally and Nine Days (2012) was awarded Best Fiction at the 2012 Indie Awards, was shortlisted for the ABIA Best General Fiction award and was named in Kirkus Review’s top 10 Historical Novels of 2013. Her latest novel is Our Tiny, Useless Hearts (2016).

 

Website: http://www.tonijordan.com/

BOOK LAUNCH: After The Carnage

When: Sunday 31 July, 4pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, click here to RSVP

Please join UQP and The Brunswick Street Bookstore for the launch of Tara June Winch’s highly anticipatedAfter The Carnage.

 

Tony Birch will launch the book.

 

A single mother resorts to extreme measures to protect her young son. A Nigerian student undertakes a United Nations internship in the hope of a better future. A recently divorced man starts a running group with members of an online forum for recovering addicts.

 

Ranging from New York to Istanbul, from Pakistan to Australia, these unforgettable stories chart the distances in their characters’ lives – whether they have grown apart from the ones they love, been displaced from their homeland, or are struggling to reconcile their dreams with reality. A collection of prodigious depth and variety,After the Carnage marks the impressive evolution of one of our finest young writers.

BOOK LAUNCH and Free Workshops: Flying Penguins by Jackie Case

When: Workshop 1: Wednesday 20 July, 6.30pm

Workshop 2: Thursday 21 July, 12.30pm

Book Launch: Thursday 21 July, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free events, please click here to RSVP

Last showing in Melbourne in 2014, fine artist Jackie Case has since exhibited in London, Paris, Singapore, Canada, Hong Kong, Australia and across The United States.  Her humorous yet delicate art works are highly sort after by collectors across the globe. Last year in Seattle alone, her work sold out within hours of opening night. For one day only, The Brunswick Street Bookstore will have on display a selection of her works before they head off to Seattle in the hope of repeating last year’s phenomenal success.

Sharing her creative process, Jackie has penned a unique and insightful methodology FLYING PENGUINS.

This book is designed to generate original ideas & artistic direction across all creative platforms. And incidentally explains how Jackie went from showing her work in local cafés to her gallery represented solo exhibition in New York. With every purchase of FLYING PENGUINS, you will automatically go into the draw to pick an original Jackie Case piece of art work on display from the works assigned to Seattle.

Other prizes include a signed and framed sketch, and a limited edition signed first print edition of FLYING PENGUINS. Two FLYING PENGUINS workshops will also be held at the store. Jackie will teach you how to make something  truly original.

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 20 July, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 20 July is Leanne Hall. Leanne is the author of two novels for young adults: This Is Shyness and its sequel, Queen of the Night. Leanne Hall was born in Melbourne and has lived there most of her life. She began her writing career with short stories, some of which have been published in Sleepers Almanac, Meanjin and Best Australian Stories. She won The Text Prize in 2009 with her debut novel This Is Shyness. Her most recent novel is Iris and the Tiger.

 

Website: http://thelongblinks.com/

BOOK LAUNCH: The Toymaker by Liam Pieper

 

When: Thursday 30 June, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please email us to RSVP.

Join us for the Melbourne launch of The Toymaker by Liam Pieper.

‘Hugely memorable, The Toymaker is an unflinching examination of the dark instinct for survival that lies in all of us.’ Hannah Kent, author of Burial Rites

 

A person is defined by the secrets they keep . . .

 

Adam Kulakov likes his life. He’s on the right side of middle age; the toy company he owns brightens the lives of children around the world; and he has more money than he can ever spend, a wife and child he adores, and as many mistresses as he can reasonably hide from them.

And he is not the only one with secrets. In 1944, Adam’s grandfather, Arkady, was imprisoned in Auschwitz and given an impossible choice. Now, as he’s coming to the end of his life, he has to keep the truth from his family, and hold back the crushing memories of his time with one of history’s greatest monsters.

 

As a mistake threatens to bring Adam’s world tumbling down around him, the past reaches for Arkady. Everything he’s spent a lifetime building will be threatened, as will everything Adam and his family think they know of the world.

 

Bold, dark and compelling, The Toymaker is a novel about privilege, fear and the great harm we can do when we are afraid of losing what we hold dear.

 

‘Pieper writes superbly. The Toymaker gives immediate and absorbing pleasure, and has similarities to J M Coetzee’s Disgrace in terms of the main character’s wretched search for redemption, both for himself and for humanity.’ Books+Publishing

Across The Seas – Australia’s Response to Refugees

Klaus Neumann in conversation with Arnold Zable

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

 

When: Tuesday 28 June, 7pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: Click here to book a ticket

Klaus Neumann’s recent book, Across The Seas; Australia’s Response to Refugees, explores the ways in which politicians have approached asylum-seeker issues in the past, and aims to inspire more creative thinking about current refugee and asylum-seeker policy.

 

Klaus Neumann is a historian based at Swinburne University’s Institute for Social Research. His 2006 book In the Interest of National Security won the John and Patricia Ward History Prize, while his Refuge Australia: Australia’s Humanitarian Record (2004) won the Australian Human Rights Commission’s 2004 Human Rights Award for Non-Fiction.

 

Arnold Zable is a highly acclaimed novelist, storyteller, educator and human rights advocate, whose books include Jewels and Ashes, The Fig Tree, Café Scheherazade, Scraps of Heaven, Sea of Many Returns andViolin Lessons. His new work, The Fighter, is published in May.

BOOK LAUNCH: Music and Freedom by Zoe Morrison

 

When: Sunday 26 June, 3pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, please email us to RSVP.

Join us for the Melbourne launch of Music and Freedom by Zoe Morrison, a gripping and beautifully written novel in the tradition of Elizabeth is Missing and the work of Elizabeth Harrower.

 

I have no use for forgiveness, not yet. But other ideas like that,

kindness, for example, I think that is fundamental. Resurrection;

I like that too. And love, of course, love, love, love.

 

Alice Murray learns to play the piano aged three on an orange orchard in rural Australia. Recognising her daughter’s gift, her mother sends Alice to boarding school in the bleak north of England, and there Alice stays for the rest of her childhood. Then she’s offered a scholarship to the Royal College of Music in London, and on a summer school in Oxford she meets Edward, an economics professor who sweeps her off her feet.

 

Alice soon finds that Edwards is damaged, and she’s trapped. She clings to her playing and to her dream of becoming a concert pianist, until disaster strikes. Increasingly isolated as the years unravel, eventually Alice can’t find it in herself to carry on. Then she hears the most beautiful music from the walls of her house …

 

This novel’s love story is that of a woman who must embrace life again if she is to survive. Inspiring and compelling, it explores the dark terrain of violence and the transformative powers of music and love.

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 8 June, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 8 June is Andrew McDonald. Andrew is a Melbourne writer and author of books for young readers. In 2009 he published his first middle-grade novel, The Greatest Blogger in the World and Son of Death is his second novel, a black comedy about grim reaping, family responsibility and rock’n’roll.  Andrew has a degree in Media Studies and is a graduate of RMIT’s Professional Writing and Editing course. He has worked in bookshops in Melbourne and London. He is a regular presenter on the schools circuit and has appeared at various writers festivals. In 2011 he was a co-judge of the Young Adult category of the Victorian Premier’s Literary Awards.

The Lucky Country? – Reinventing Australia: Professor Ian Lowe AO in conversation with Glyn Davis AC

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

 

When: Tuesday 24 May, 7pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: Click here to book a ticket

Join us for the Melbourne launch of one of the most significant books of our age on the future of Australia, by one of our leading climate change scientists.

 

In his new release, The Lucky Country? Reinventing Australia, award-winning academic and scientist Ian Lowe questions Australia’s identity, and what kind of future we want for our descendants. Inspired by Donald Horne’s iconic 1967 polemic The Lucky Country, he turns his expert eye to consider where Australia is now, and our dire geographical, social, economic and environmental future if we do not seek an alternative.

 

Professor Ian Lowe is emeritus professor of science, technology and society at Griffith University, and adjunct professor at Sunshine Coast and Flinders Universities. He is the author of more than 500 publications and of 20 books, including Bigger or Better? Australia’s population debate (2012) and A Voice of Reason: Reflections on Australia (2010).

 

His contributions to environmental science have won him a Centenary Medal, the Eureka Prize, the Prime Minister’s Environment Award for Outstanding Individual Achievement, and he was made an Officer of the Order of Australia in 2001 for services to science, technology and the environment.

 

He has served on many advisory bodies to all levels of government, and was president of the Australian Conservation Foundation (ACF) from 2004–2014. In 2015 Lowe was appointed to the Expert Advisory Committee for the Nuclear Fuel Cycle Royal Commission in South Australia.

 

Professor Glyn Davis has been Vice-Chancellor and Principal of the University of Melbourne since January 2005, and is Professor of Political Science in the Faculty of Arts.

 

Professor Davis publishes on public policy, and is co-author of The Australian Policy Handbook, now in its fifth edition. In recognition of his position as a leading academic at the centre of Australia’s tertiary education transformation, he presented the 2010 Boyer lectures The Republic of Learning: higher education transforms Australia.He has also served Chairman of Universitas 21, a global network of leading international universities, and a Director of the Menzies Centre for Australian Studies at King’s College London. Professor Davis is a Fellow of the Academy of Social Sciences in Australia, a Companion in the Order of Australia, and a Director of the Melbourne Theatre Company, the Grattan Institute, the LH Martin Institute and Asialink.

 

 

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 25 May, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 25 May is Ian Laking. Ian is a young author from New Zealand who writes fantasy stories for young adults and children.His style is contemporary, with elements of classic fiction, and his current series of detective stories is an introduction to the world of the Empire. Laking loves a great twist, and every story contains unexpected turns to keep readers wanting more.

Website: https://ihlaking.com/

A Loving, Faithful Animal by Josephine Rowe: Book Launch

When: Satruday 14 May, 5pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, click here to RSVP

 

UQP and The Brunswick Street Bookstore warmly invite you to the launch of A Loving, Faithful Animal — the much-anticipated debut novel from one of Australia’s most gifted young writers.

 

Through the beautifully realised voices of Ru and her family, Josephine Rowe tells a powerful story of growing up, of challenging fate, and of the scars left behind by those we love.

 

‘Rowe’s lyrical writing–which is almost prose-poetry at times–is utterly compelling. This is a striking and highly original novel for readers of Australian literary fiction.’ Books+Publishing, four-and-a-half star review

 

Paddy O’Reilly, author of Peripheral Vision, will launch the book.

Refreshments will be served. Free event, but RSVPs appreciated: click here to RSVP

Digital Ethnography: Book Launch

When: Thursday 12 May, 6pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

Join DERC as they launch their latest publication Digital Ethnography: Principles and Practice. Dean of the RMIT School of Media and Communication, Prof. Martyn Hook will open the event.

 

This sharp, innovative book champions the rising significance of ethnographic research on the use of digital resources around the world. It contextualises digital and pre-digital ethnographic research and demonstrates how the methodological, practical and theoretical dimensions are increasingly intertwined.

Digital ethnography is central to our understanding of the social world; it can shape methodology and methods, and provides the technological tools needed to research society. The authoritative team of authors clearly set out how to research localities, objects and events as well as providing insights into exploring individuals’ or communities’ lived experiences, practices and relationships.

 

The book

Defines a series of central concepts in this new branch of social and cultural research

Challenges existing conceptual and analytical categories

Showcases new and innovative methods

Theorises the digital world in new ways

Encourages us to rethink pre-digital practices, media and environments

This is the ideal introduction for anyone intending to conduct ethnographic research in today’s digital society.

 

Authors

Sarah Pink – RMIT University

Heather Horst – RMIT University

John Postill – RMIT University

Larissa Hjorth – RMIT University

Tania Lewis – RMIT University

Jo Tacchi – RMIT University

Toni Jordan in conversation with Jo Case

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

 

When: Tuesday 10 May, 7pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event

Join us for an evening with Toni Jordan and Jo Case who will discuss Toni’s highly anticipated new release, Our Tiny, Useless Hearts, which has been described as “a highly entertaining romp through the complexities of modern relationships; a classic farce in the style of Wilde’s The Importance of Being Earnest, complete with physical comedy, exaggerated situations and a spot of class commentary in the form of suburban satire” (Books + Publishing).

 

Toni Jordan is the author of four novels, including the international bestseller Addition (2008) which was longlisted for the Miles Franklin award. Fall Girl (2010) has been optioned for film, and Nine Days was awarded Best Fiction at the 2012 Indie Awards.

 

Jo Case is the Program Manager at Melbourne Writers Festival. Before this, she was the Wheeler Centre’s senior writer/editor. Her first book, Boomer and Me: A memoir of motherhood, and Asperger’s was published in Australia and the UK in 2013.

 

She has been books editor of The Big Issue, associate editor of Kill Your Darlings, deputy editor of Australian Book Review and editor of Readings Monthly. Her writing has been published in the Australian, the Age, the Sydney Morning Herald, the Monthly, Best Australian Stories, the Sleepers Almanac, Australian Book Reviewand other publications.

Brunswick Street All Out

When: Sunday 1 May – all day

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

Live Drawing at Brunswick Street Bookstore:

Come and watch fine artist, author and Illustrator Elise Hurst draw the portrait of a giant Rabbit on our front window. Come down to spend some time watching Elise work her magic!

11:00 AM to 1:00 PM

 

An Art Class with Tull:

Tull will be reading from his book, What Happens Next? and will be teaching children how to draw some of the characters from his book using simple geometric shapes, numbers and alphabets. Learn to draw a bear, a fox, a hare and even an ogre too! And to finish off the activity, everyone will get to create their own stories based on the catchy phrase, “What Happens Next?”. Suitable for children aged 5 onwards.

To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

11:30 AM to 12:30 PM

 

Imaginarium ARTernoon with Elise Hurst and Tull Suwannakit:

Acclaimed children’s book author and illustrator, Elise Hurst will be joined by Tull Suwannakit in a collaborated art workshop, Imaginarium ARTernoon.  Tull will teach children how to draw some of the characters from his book, What Happens Next? And Elise will demonstrate how to turn a picture into an imaginative world of wonders based on her book,Imagine a City. Suitable for children aged 5 onwards.

To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

1:30 PM to 2:30 PM

 

Character Design Workshop:

In this workshop, Tull will guide you through the practical creative process of character design used in picture books illustration.  Participants create their own unique characters using stretch, squash and transformation techniques, as well as bringing out their own style of illustration. Illustration elements of line, form, motion and expression are also explored in this workshop. Suitable for adults aged 18 onwards. The workshop is designed to suit participants with all levels of art skills.

To RSVP email events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

3:00 PM to 4:30 PM

 

Open House at the Bookstore:

The Brunswick Street Bookstore cordially invites you to an open-house viewing of our newly available first-floor space. Visit for a chat and a glass of wine with owner Peter Mews, and let us know your thoughts. We’re looking for ideas, feedback and expressions of interest regarding this bright and accessible area, which would lend itself equally well to use as an office, studio, retail showroom or gallery space.

5:00 PM to 6:00 PM

IG – https://www.instagram.com/brunswickstreetallout/

 

FB – https://www.facebook.com/brunswickstreetallout/?fref=ts

 

www – http://brunswickstreetallout.com.au/

 

Event – https://www.facebook.com/events/208340636212633/

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 27 April, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday 26 April is Dr. Sean McMullen. Author of the acclaimed cyberpunk/steampunk Greatwinter Trilogy, Sean is one of Australia’s top Science Fiction and Fantasy authors. Winning over a dozen awards (including multiple Analog Readers Awarda and a Hugo Award finalist), his work is a mixture of romance, invention and adventure, populated by strange and dynamic characters. The settings for Sean’s work range from the Roman Empire, through Medieval Europe, to cities of the distant future. He is a musician, medievalist, star gazer, karate instructor, felineophile, and IT manager.

Six Under Eight: Madeleine West in conversation with Zoe Foster

 

When: Friday 29 April, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Brunswick Street Bookstore. Free event, RSVP essential

SIX UNDER EIGHT!!!

 

Join actor, author and Supermum MADELEINE WEST as she is joined in a one off conversation with her friend, the fabulous ZOE FOSTER BLAKE talking all things SIX UNDER EIGHT

 

Come along to the Brunswick Street Bookstore for some wine and nibbles and a good old natter about all things motherhood with two of  Melbourne’s favourite Mums.

 

Free event, RSVP essential: events@brunswickstreetbookstore.com

 

SPACES LIMITED. BOOK FAST TO AVOID MISSING OUT!

 

Six Under Eight is a hilarious, insightful and moving diary, diving into the chaos of juggling kids’ birthday parties, bath time, lunchboxes, breastfeeding, house renovations, shopping lists, nappies, auditions, mastitis, mood swings, occasional glamour, teething and tantrums.

 

Interspersed with heartfelt, honest and witty diary entries, Madeleine offers her own parenting tips and insights based on her wealth of experience; from nursery purchases that have proved pointless to what you do actually need, preparing siblings for the arrival of new family members, getting the kids involved, getting enough sleep, serious illness in children, creating memories and how to be a part of your children’s day, even when you are not there.

 

Often chaotic, sometimes exasperating but never dull, Six Under Eight is the mother of all parenting diaries. In her warm, selfdeprecating style Madeleine shows what it takes to raise a large family and keep your sanity, wisdom and sense of humour somewhat intact.

The Art of Reading – Damon Young

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

 

When: Tuesday 26 April, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall Reading Room. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

Join us for this stimulating event to hear Damon discuss his latest release, The Art of Reading. Introduced by revered journalist and commentator, Jonathan Green, ABC presenter and Meanjin editor.

 

Dr Damon Young is a philosopher, author and commentator, with a reputation as a clear and witty communicator of ‘big ideas’. In 2013, he won the Australasian Association of Philosophy’s media prize for his public writing and broadcasting. His books include How to Think About Exercise (2014, Pan Macmillan), Philosophy in the Garden (2013, MUP), and Distraction (2008, MUP).

Young is a popular ABC radio guest, and writes regularly for newspapers. He has also published short fiction, poetry and a children’s book My Nanna is a Ninja (2014), and is an Honorary Fellow at the University of Melbourne.

 

In his new book, The Art of Reading (April 2016, MUP), he reveals the pleasures of this intimate pursuit through a rich sample of literature: from Virginia Woolf’s diaries to Batman comics. Devoting each chapter to a literary virtue – patience, curiosity, courage, pride, temperance, justice – the book celebrates the reader’s power: to turn shapes on a page into a lifelong adventure.

 

Tickets are free, but bookings are essential. Don’t miss out!

 

Praise for The Art of Reading

 

‘A compelling riff on the best kind of reading—with unfettered curiosity and courage.’

—Hilary McPhee

 

‘A beautifully written and thoughtfully constructed ode to the inner worlds opened up by the page, and the role of reading in the discovery and development of the self. The Art of Reading is just what I needed to remind me I am neither alone—nor irrational—in my bibliophilia.’

—Tara Moss

Mietta’s Legacy – with Stephanie Alexander and Patricia O’Donnell

Event presented by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust

 

When: Monday 11 April, 6.30pm

 

Where: at the Fitzroy Town Hall. Free event, but bookings essential: click here to book a ticket

Please join us to celebrate Mietta O’Donnell’s legacy and the new edition of  Mietta’s Italian Family Recipes. Patricia and Stephanie will talk about their memories of Mietta, her influence on the growth of the Melbourne food and wine scene, and also discuss a few of the recipes and chapters in the book, followed by Q&A and book signing.

 

Mietta O’Donnell (1951-2001) was a greatly admired restauranteur and author, as well as a profoundly influential figure in the arts and cultural world. Mietta inspired people and ideas, not only about food, but also about the physical fabric and vibrancy of our city and its culture.

 

From the stage of her celebrated and iconic restaurant, Mietta’s, which she and her partner Tony Knox established and ran in Fitzroy and then in Alfred Place, Melbourne, Mietta orchestrated a salon where an astonishing range of art forms was performed – from comedy to art song, poetry to play readings, with music ranging from jazz to opera alongside forums for social and political issues. Her support for the arts and artists was recognised with a Green Room Award for Outstanding Contribution to the Performing Arts in Melbourne.

 

Together, she and her partner, photographer Tony Knox, published a number of books, including Great Australian Chefs and their annual guide, Mietta’s Best Australian Restaurants. Mietta’s Italian Family Recipes presents over 185 recipes, covering antipasto, soups, risotto, pasta, fish, meat, pizza and desserts, demonstrating the ways in which original Italian recipes can be re-interpreted to suit modern Australian life, ingredients and equipment. This new edition includes forewords by Mietta’s sister, Patricia O’Donnell, and by her partner, Tony Knox, as well as a publisher’s note and a selection of new photographs.

 

Stephanie Alexander AO is regarded as one of Australia’s great food educators. Her reputation has been earned through her thirty years as an owner-chef in several restaurants (for over 20 years Stephanie’s Restaurant was at the heart of everything culinary in Australia), as the author of 14 influential books and hundreds of articles about food matters, and for her ground breaking work in creating the Stephanie Alexander Kitchen Garden Foundation. Everything Stephanie has achieved and worked towards has been driven by her desire to break down people’s anxieties about cooking, to emphasise the beauty of produce fresh from the garden, to demonstrate the pleasures of sharing around a table, so that more of us will choose to live a more joyful and healthier life. Stephanie’s fifth book, The Cook’s Companion is regarded as an Australian classic.

 

Patricia O’Donnell was a teacher and educational psychologist. From 1978-2002 Patricia was the owner and manager of the heritage listed Mietta’s Queenscliff Hotel after which she established the North Fitzroy Star Hotel, a much loved place for locals, writers and book groups. She was the initiator and deputy president of the Queenscliff Carnival of Words and host of the Queenscliff Music Festival. Patricia was a member of the Library Board of Victoria (1999-2008) and is currently a Board Member of the Abbotsford Convent Foundation, the Australian Art Orchestra, and the Mietta Foundation.

 

Doors open at 6.00pm.

 

Event sponsored by The Thomas, Samuel & George Ewing Trust.

Presented in partnership with Brunswick Street Bookstore and Black Inc.

 

 

Bookings essential.  There is no need to bring a ticket with you to this event.

Liberal Loyalties: Niki Savva on The Road to Ruin

When: Tuesday 29 March, 6.15pm

 

Where: at The Wheeler Centre. BOOKED OUT SORRY

Earlier this month, Niki Savva’s book on the political partnership of Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin sparked a flurry of press. There were attacks, counter-attacks, impassioned defences of the Abbott Government legacy – and just as vehement defences of long political and journalistic careers.

 

This Fifth Estate conversation offers a chance for a deeper dissection of the issues raised in the book – and in the media surrounding it – as well as a broader discussion of the trajectory of the Liberal Party. In The Road to Ruin: How Tony Abbott and Peta Credlin Destroyed Their Own Government, Savva argues that while the partnership between the former PM and his chief of staff was effective in opposition, it was catastrophic in government.

 

Join Sally Warhaft and senior member of the Canberra press gallery, Niki Savva, for a discussion of political partnerships, party loyalty, the looming election and the state of conservative politics in Australian today.

 

Niki Savva is one of the most senior correspondents in the Canberra Press Gallery. She was twice political correspondent on the Australian, and headed up the Canberra bureaus of both the Herald Sun and the Age. When family tragedy forced a career change, she became Peter Costello’s press secretary for six years and was then on John Howard’s staff for three. Her work has brought her into intimate contact with the major political players of the last 35 years. She is now a regular columnist for the Australian, and often appears on ABC TV’s The Insiders as well as on political panels on Sky.

Portrait of Sally Warhaft

 

Sally Warhaft is a Melbourne broadcaster, anthropologist and writer and the host of the Wheeler Centre’s live journalism series, The Fifth Estate, now in its fourth year. She is a former editor of The Monthly magazine and the author of the bestselling book Well May We Say: The Speeches that Made Australia.

What’s Up MuMu? by David Mackintosh

MuMu is not having a good day. Nothing can put things right. AND THAT’S THAT. Her best friend Lox knows her better than anyone, but does he have enough tricks up his sleeve to put things right?

A rattly rollercoaster of a story from award-winning author/illustrator David Mackintosh, this bright and witty story of friendship, patience and modern construction methods will have you wishing for a best friend like Lox.

The first 10 copies include a charming lapel badge hand-made by the artist. Hurry: ONLY 1 COPY LEFT!!

 

The Morning Bell – live podcast

When: Wednesday 16 March, 7pm

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

The Morning Bell Podcast is a mix of interviews with emerging writers and jovial chit chat.

It is hosted by Joel Martin and Luke Manly, a pair of up and coming Melbourne writers, who arrive at the Brunswick Street Bookstore with a fascinating guest from the writing industry every second Wednesday.

The next guest on Wednesday March 17th is George Ivanoff. George has written over 90 books for children and teenagers, including fiction and non-fiction. He has written school readers, library reference books, chapter books, novelettes, novels and even a short story collection. He has books on both the Victorian Premier’s and the NSW Premier’s Reading Challenge booklists.

Enemy: Ruth Clare in conversation with Cate Blake

When: Thursday 17 March

 

Where: at The Brunswick Street Bookstore

 

A brutal, compelling and insightful memoir from an exciting new Australian talent.

 

Ruth Clare’s father was one of the 19,000 Australians whose birth date condemned them to give up the life they had planned so they could serve their country fighting in the Vietnam War.

 

In 1974, the year Ruth Clare was born, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) hadn’t been recognised as a condition. Growing up, the war and her father’s part in it, was rarely mentioned, “No one ever told me the way Dad behaved might have anything to do with a war. No one ever told me it wasn’t my fault”.

 

Ruth’s father returned a changed man: violent, controlling and unpredictable. Her first childhood memory is of him hitting her. When her parents’ marriage fell apart and he left for good, Ruth’s, mother descended into alcoholism. Her father’s volatility, followed by her mother’s absent parenting meant Ruth learned to parent herself. She made her own decisions and became fierce in the face of danger.

When Ruth became a mother herself, it forced her to confront the way her father had treated her, and to recognise how it had shaped her. Wanting to understand the experiences that had irrevocably altered her father, she met with other veterans and began learning their stories. What Ruth uncovered left her with a surprising empathy for the man who caused her so much pain and heartache. “It would always be part of my lifelong journey to accept that I did not have to be perfect to receive love. But in being more compassionate toward Dad, I had gained the unexpected bonus of being more accepting of myself.”

 

‘Ruth Clare brings history into the home with piercing intelligence, unflinching honesty and total, terrifying recall. By drawing a direct line from the violence of war to the brutality of domesticity, Enemy refuses to excuse the tormentor yet tries to understand the legacy of torment. I wanted this book to stop and I couldn’t put this book down.’  Clare Wright

 

Ruth Clare did a degree in biochemistry minoring in journalism before deciding to live her dream of becoming an actor. She landed roles on Neighbours and Blue Heelers as well as many commercials, but gave it all up to become a professional writer in 2004. She has written for magazines and created a range of educational materials as well as working as a copywriter for a wide range of business clients. Ruth was a finalist in the 2014 Cowley Literary Award for an abridged excerpt from Enemy.

Cate Blake is the Managing Editor for Penguin General at Penguin Random House Australia.